Vocabulary

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miriam
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Vocabulary

Post by miriam » Fri Jan 24, 2020 2:53 am

I came across a list of words recently, supposedly used in college entrance exams in the USA, and spotted a few I didn't know. So I thought I'd see how many other people couldn't define from this list:

abase

abate

abhor

abhorrence

abhorrent

ablution

abnegate

abrogate

absolution

absolve

abstain

acme

actuate

acumen

adroit

aesthetic

avarice

baleful

banal

beget

bilious

bombastic

brazen

brusque

buttress

capacious

comport

congenial

congenital

crass

dastard

deleterious

deride

dictator

disseminate

dogmatic

enervate

evanescent

fallacious

feckless

fetid

flaccid

furtive

germane

globular

haughty

heinous

hiatus

hirsute

hoary

impervious

impetuous

inane

ineffable

irascible

juxtapose

jugular

knavery

largess

latent

laud

malefactor

mendacious

mendicant

modicum

morass

nefarious

nugatory

obviate

onus

ostracize

paean

paradox

petulant

philistine

pithy

prolix

prudent

rancor

rebuff

rectitude

ribald

sagacity

seminal

succulent

supine

surreptitious

sycophant

tangential

tawdry

titter

torpid

torrid

truncate

ubiquitous

underlie

upbraid

vindicate

wane

wax

whet

winsome

wizen

So, how many and which words were unfamiliar or did you define wrong? I'd never heard of abnegate, nugatory, obviate, prolix, rectitude or mendicant. I thought enervate was to excite not to weaken or disempower, and hoary, paean, rancor, torpid and irascible I could use in a sentence but not define. So I was at least 12 away from knowing them all.
Miriam

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Punkgirluk
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Re: Vocabulary

Post by Punkgirluk » Sat Jan 25, 2020 12:04 pm

Interesting...I wonder whether the chosen words may partly reflect the bigger role of religion in American culture? Certainly mendicant, rectitude and abnegate I’ve only come across in a religious context (I knew eventually I’d find a purpose for all that religious education!).
Nugatory and prolix were new ones to me as well though and several of the other words I was only familiar with in different forms- so wizened rather than wizen.

alexh
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Re: Vocabulary

Post by alexh » Wed Jan 29, 2020 10:54 am

You might be interested in this vocabulary IQ test at open psychometrics.

https://openpsychometrics.org/tests/VIQT/
VIQT wrote: Vocabulary IQ Test
This is an interactive vocabulary test that gives results in the form of an IQ score.

Introduction: "Intelligence Quotient" is a way of reporting cognitive ability test scores so that they can be easily compared across tests in a way that automatically takes into account the difficulty of each test. Raw scores are converted onto a scale where the average is set to be 100, and the standard deviation is 15 (this forces a certain percentage of people to fall within certain score ranges).

IQ tests usually contain many different tests and are organized into different abilities. But this is not a Full Scale IQ Test, just specifically a vocabulary test. Vocabulary is usually considered a good measure of Verbal-ability/Verbal-IQ, but may not be an accurate measure for non-native English speakers or people with unusual educational upbringings.

Procedure: The test has 45 questions. In each question you are given five words and asked to select two that have the same meaning. You get penalized for wrong answers, so if you do not know, select "don't know".

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miriam
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Re: Vocabulary

Post by miriam » Sat Feb 01, 2020 2:41 am

alexh wrote:
Wed Jan 29, 2020 10:54 am
You might be interested in this vocabulary IQ test at open psychometrics.

https://openpsychometrics.org/tests/VIQT/
Some of those are quite hard! I got 42/45, which they say maps at about 130 on a standard scale. I don't know how accurate that estimate is.
Miriam

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Re: Vocabulary

Post by Spatch » Sun Feb 02, 2020 12:47 pm

I found it reminiscent of the quick and dirty VIQ tests like the NART and WTAR that were called 'premorbid' (but I suspect is called something kinder now).

Interestingly, for me there was some convergent validity with other full scale batteries I have taken at various times across my life. That may have been coincidence though, and I wasn't able to find any reliablity/validity data for this test.
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alexh
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Re: Vocabulary

Post by alexh » Fri Feb 07, 2020 11:41 am

miriam wrote:
Sat Feb 01, 2020 2:41 am
alexh wrote:
Wed Jan 29, 2020 10:54 am
You might be interested in this vocabulary IQ test at open psychometrics.

https://openpsychometrics.org/tests/VIQT/
Some of those are quite hard! I got 42/45, which they say maps at about 130 on a standard scale. I don't know how accurate that estimate is.
I am not sure either, I had 44/45 but then I misspent my youth improving my word power with reader's digests. I think they said that is equivalent to 133 or 135 so it must flatten out for scores over 40?

I would suspect the 133 equivalent they gave is at the high end of what I'd get on a very good day on a full scale test. I think from completing subtests for colleague's practice I'd get a full scale score in the 120s

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