Advantages of therapy delivered by a CP

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sparko
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Advantages of therapy delivered by a CP

Post by sparko » Sat Jun 13, 2020 8:44 am

Apologies if this isn’t in the right place. For a client accessing therapy (let’s say something like ACT or CFT), what are the advantages of such therapies delivered by a CP versus a counsellor/psychotherapist? I realise individual competence comes into it, and a CP role is far more than delivering therapy, but from a purely therapeutic intervention, what would potentially make a CP better at delivering those therapies? I picked ACT and CFT examples as some DClinPsy courses barely touch on them, so theoretically a CP and counsellor or psychotherapist may attend the same specific training courses post-qualification in order to learn them.

I hope this question makes sense and I realise it may border on controversial but my intention is not to disparage any profession; I’m just looking to develop my own understanding when it comes to this aspect of a CP role.

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miriam
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Re: Advantages of therapy delivered by a CP

Post by miriam » Sat Jun 13, 2020 4:00 pm

In a general sense, we are not necessarily the best therapists, particularly where the task is to deliver a specific model of therapy. A lot of therapy is about the quality of the relationship, and the degree to which the individual feels heard and understood, rather than the model of therapy used or the profession of the individual delivering it. But our ability to do a broad and holistic bio-psycho-social assessment, to formulate and to individualise therapy is particularly good compared to single-modality therapists. I've posted elsewhere about the analogy of CPs being the structural engineers of the therapy world.
Last edited by miriam on Mon Jun 15, 2020 12:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Spatch
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Re: Advantages of therapy delivered by a CP

Post by Spatch » Sat Jun 13, 2020 6:09 pm

from a purely therapeutic intervention, what would potentially make a CP better at delivering those therapies?
I would echo Miriam's comments, and always cite Roth and Fonagy's work in What works for whom: A critical review of psychotherapy research. In a nutshell, its more about therapeutic rapport and non-specific compatibility rather than a particular approach or type of therapist that is best. Nonetheless, if I was to take your comment in the spirit of an exam essay question, and come up with a compelling argument I would make the following argument for the strenght of CPs as a collective class.

First of all, although we all hate the intensely draining process of selection, it does leave you with a highly filtered, motivated, experienced and very capable group of individuals as the raw material of the profession. They are then subjected to a standardised set of experiences that expose them across the lifespan, compulsory exposure to LD, and access to some of the severest presentations. Stripping away the research, MDT working, neuro and other mandatory competencies, this lifespan exposure and breadth of work is a really good grounding for anyone starting out as a therapist. I am sure that many counsellors and psychotherapists can attain those experiences individually, and may tailor their training and post qual experiences to attain this, but as a class this comes as standard for CPs from the worst to the best of us.

At the moment, if you compare this to other forms of therapy where training institutions are primarily motivated to run profitable courses and focus on who can pay, and don't offer funded training, the type of entrant is often different. In some ways this is a strength, as it makes professions like counselling and other psychotherapies more accessible initially. Although it can be gruelling to get the credited hours, pay your own supervisor, find your own placements and fend for yourself, it can lead to more diversity, dedication to the craft of therapy above all else, and an in some ways a more loyal workforce that is less focussed on climbing the NHS ladder and more focussed on 'doing therapy'. However, it's also easier to pay your way to qualification, take easier options and avoid certain competencies because you don't have to do them. The range is SO varied.

Does this make any given non CP therapist better or worse than a CP? Nope. Ideally, if I was chosing a therapist for myself I would audition several and see which one I clicked with, and which one 'got' me best. In my life that has never been a CP. However, if I was to pick someone from a list of names I can't meet, or I was looking to recruit a generic bod to a clinical role and wanted a safe pair of hands that could handle most things I throw at them, CPs become suddenly a lot more attractive as a class.
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Alex
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Re: Advantages of therapy delivered by a CP

Post by Alex » Sun Jun 14, 2020 11:14 pm

sparko wrote:
Sat Jun 13, 2020 8:44 am
Apologies if this isn’t in the right place. For a client accessing therapy (let’s say something like ACT or CFT), what are the advantages of such therapies delivered by a CP versus a counsellor/psychotherapist? I realise individual competence comes into it, and a CP role is far more than delivering therapy, but from a purely therapeutic intervention, what would potentially make a CP better at delivering those therapies? I picked ACT and CFT examples as some DClinPsy courses barely touch on them, so theoretically a CP and counsellor or psychotherapist may attend the same specific training courses post-qualification in order to learn them.

I hope this question makes sense and I realise it may border on controversial but my intention is not to disparage any profession; I’m just looking to develop my own understanding when it comes to this aspect of a CP role.
I do not think you can go by a better profession when it comes to the delivery of a particular therapy such as ACT or CFT. It will depend on how good their training is, if they have received high-quality supervision and the practitioner's individual skill.

In my book, good therapy is good therapy whatever the MH profession and no one holds a monopoly on it.

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Re: Advantages of therapy delivered by a CP

Post by alexh » Wed Jul 15, 2020 4:17 pm

On the contrary, it is easy to believe but much, much harder to demonstrate that either quality (or level, or type) of training or the quality (or amount or type) of supervision lead to measurably better outcomes for clients.

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Re: Advantages of therapy delivered by a CP

Post by Alex » Thu Jul 16, 2020 1:27 pm

alexh wrote:
Wed Jul 15, 2020 4:17 pm
On the contrary, it is easy to believe but much, much harder to demonstrate that either quality (or level, or type) of training or the quality (or amount or type) of supervision lead to measurably better outcomes for clients.
If you are referring to my post, I stated delivery of therapy meaning fidelity to model, not outcomes.

alexh
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Re: Advantages of therapy delivered by a CP

Post by alexh » Sun Jul 26, 2020 1:55 pm

What use is faithful adherence to a model if the outcome is not good?

I'd suggest that CPs are less adherent to model than other therapists because of the breadth of training.

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