Common Myths about CBT - comments

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DangerMouse
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Common Myths about CBT - comments

Post by DangerMouse » Thu Mar 10, 2011 8:35 am

Hey Baa,

Really great article, thanks!

baa wrote:
Ellis' REBT (Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy) certainly was rather... confrontational...


But could I just pull you up on this statement? I was talking to a CP only yesterday who uses REBT, along with other colleagues, in the early intervention in psychosis team, so I'm not sure what you mean by "was" - it sounds like it is still used - and to good effect. Plus, from what she said and some of the literature I read about it (not much, admittedly - it was only yesterday) it doesn't sound particularly "confrontational"; or not confrontational in a bad way, which sounds a bit implied here...my apologys if that's not the case :)

Anyway, it just felt important for me to express this - do with it what you will :)

Thanks ;)

DM :)

PS, can't get the quotes/bbcode? to work/switched on...
You need to untick "disable BBCode" below the box you type in. Check your profile to see if you have disabled it as a default, as you shouldn't need to manually do this each time you post - mod

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baa
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Re: Common Myths about CBT

Post by baa » Thu Mar 10, 2011 2:06 pm

I need a better word than confrontational, I will steal my colleagues REBT book and have a snoop! Directive maybe...
At least I'm not as mad as that one!

DangerMouse
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Re: Common Myths about CBT

Post by DangerMouse » Fri Mar 11, 2011 5:49 pm

PS, can't get the quotes/bbcode? to work/switched on...
You need to untick "disable BBCode" below the box you type in. Check your profile to see if you have disabled it as a default, as you shouldn't need to manually do this each time you post - mod

There is no option to untick the disable bbcode for the wiki thread, for me at least (and it could be, I suppose, for me and only on this thread! Anyway, the tick box isn't there...

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Ruthie
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Re: Common Myths about CBT

Post by Ruthie » Fri Mar 11, 2011 10:54 pm

baa wrote:CBT is for simple problems, you need something else for complex problems. People with personality disorders/psychosis/multiple difficulties etc are too complex to benefit from a standard approach to CBT.

As long as the client is at least minimally engaged in the process, CBT has been shown to work with a wide variety of Axis 1 problems, including those clients who have severe and chronic difficulties as a result. CBT has been shown to be effective with clients experiencing psychosis. It is also being used with clients with personality difficulties with excellent results in RCTs
I'm having ishoooos with the idea of clients needing to be at least "minimally engaged" in the process. I don't have any evidence base to back this up (sorry Beck) but my experience is that the clients who do best in CBT are the clients who are the most highly invested and determined to change. In fact, clients with what look like simple problems who don't have the drive to change them aren't going to get very far. I have worked with clients who on paper and even in the first few sessions seem very complex or even overwhelming, but because of their sheer determination make a lot of progress. (Of course this is probably true of any therapy, not just CBT!)

I think with complex clients want matters is having a really good overarching formulation that fits for the client and finding meaningful goals that the client really wants to accomplish. Then no matter how complex or longstanding the difficulties are, I'm usually pretty confident in the possibility of significant change.
If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.

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baa
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Re: Common Myths about CBT

Post by baa » Sat Mar 12, 2011 9:02 am

Noted and edited :D
At least I'm not as mad as that one!

NeoPsych
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Re: Common Myths about CBT

Post by NeoPsych » Tue Mar 22, 2011 10:34 am

From an IAPT hand-out (CBT and how to the the most from it).

What is CBT not?

* CBT is not a magic formula.
* It's not something that's done to you. The aim is to help you become your own
expert in managing your mood positively: not just now, but in the future as well.
* CBT isn't just thinking positive.
* It's not about complaining about problems.
* It is not passive. Change needs action on your part.

What do I need to do to get the most from CBT?

* You need to use the tools and skills outside the therapy room.
Like any skill, the more you practice, the easier they become.
* Commitment. CBT needs you to put some time aside to review
and practice the material.
* Complete the homework - CBT is about practice.
* CBT will only work if you do the work. It is something that is
not done to you. If you don't do the work, CBT won't work.

NeoPsych

NeoPsych
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Re: Common Myths about CBT

Post by NeoPsych » Tue Mar 22, 2011 5:10 pm

Addendum for the sake of comprehensiveness.

What is CBT not?

- CBT is about learning to see things in a more healthy, balanced way
rather than 'positive thinking.'
- It is not just about talking, but about action and doing things differently.
- It is not enough to just attend the sessions.

NeoPsych

evat
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Re: Common Myths about CBT

Post by evat » Sat Feb 04, 2012 11:18 pm

Great article

theballboy
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Re: Common Myths about CBT

Post by theballboy » Thu May 30, 2019 9:14 am

Great post, thanks

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LT87
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Re: Common Myths about CBT

Post by LT87 » Thu May 30, 2019 7:08 pm

For anyone interested, these myths are taken from Chapter 2 of An Introduction to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy: Skills and Applications (2007) by David Westbrook, Helen Kennerley and Joan Kirk.

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LT87
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Re: Common Myths about CBT

Post by LT87 » Thu May 30, 2019 7:17 pm

I perhaps should have said “can be found in” as OP may have well have been an author involved in this book/chapter.

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miriam
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Re: Common Myths about CBT

Post by miriam » Thu May 30, 2019 7:31 pm

LT87 wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 7:17 pm
I perhaps should have said “can be found in” as OP may have well have been an author involved in this book/chapter.
Do you mean that they are literally cut and pasted from a book - in which case we'd definitely want to reference it, as I wouldn't want to plagiarise content (as the author of the OP is not one of the people you listed as authors) - or that the post was influenced by and contains similar content to the chapter which therefore merits a mention and would be interesting related reading? I assumed that as Baa was one of many of our members to use CBT to a high level, they were giving their opinion or summarising something they had read, rather than cutting and pasting...
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LT87
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Re: Common Myths about CBT

Post by LT87 » Thu May 30, 2019 8:00 pm

LT87 wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 7:17 pm
I perhaps should have said “can be found in” as OP may have well have been
an author involved in this book/chapter.
Do you mean that they are literally cut and pasted from a book - in which
case we'd definitely want to reference it, as I wouldn't want to plagiarise
content (as the author of the OP is not one of the people you listed as
authors) - or that the post was influenced by and contains similar content
to the chapter which therefore merits a mention and would be interesting
related reading? I assumed that as Baa was one of many of our members to
use CBT to a high level, they were giving their opinion or summarising
something they had read, rather than cutting and pasting...
I’ve just checked against my PDF copy of that chapter - OPs bold headings are identical to the chapter sub-headings (the second half), and the text underneath is the book text but slightly reworded (and with references removed). I would upload a screenshot but I’m not sure whether that’s breaching copyright!

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LT87
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Re: Common Myths about CBT

Post by LT87 » Thu May 30, 2019 8:38 pm

In fact, chapter 2 can be found in the google books preview here - https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=wiK ... &q&f=false

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