Is there scope for high intensity therapists to be scientist practitioners?

This section is for discussion relating to the Layard report, and subsequent schemes like Improving Access to Psychological Therapies where lower intensity inteventions are offered in primary care
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grizzlybear06
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Is there scope for high intensity therapists to be scientist practitioners?

Post by grizzlybear06 » Mon Mar 09, 2020 11:29 am

Hi all

I really feel ready for a change this year. I work in IAPT as a PWP and have applied for the DClinpsy but was also thinking of applying to HIT training.

I would prefer a scientist practitioner role. I really love being involved in research, audit and service development. However I know the doctorate is competitive and if I don’t get on this year, I’ll probably leave it a few years if I ever do apply again.

I’ve been looking at HIT as an alternative career but I worry that there is no scope for them to be scientist practitioners. I know some do work in universities but this seems to be towards the end of their careers. The majority I know are therapy heavy. PWPs probably do more in terms of audit and development in my service. Does anyone know of any HITs who are involved in scientist practitioner activities? Or even if there could be scope for a HIT to have that flexibility? I worry I’d be boxing myself in so to speak.

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Victoriomantic
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Re: Is there scope for high intensity therapists to be scientist practitioners?

Post by Victoriomantic » Sat Mar 28, 2020 1:15 pm

Hiya, recently qualified HIT here. I'd be interested to know the answer for this too. In my experience I haven't seen it toooo much but I have only been in IAPT and I know people do get CBT Therapist roles elsewhere. There are opportunities in some services to be involved with audits and pilots so that is always a start. Plus I think a lot (most? all?) NHS Trusts will have Research & Development teams too, so could be an avenue to look into.

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Spatch
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Re: Is there scope for high intensity therapists to be scientist practitioners?

Post by Spatch » Sat Mar 28, 2020 5:27 pm

This will depend on what you mean by a scientist practitioner.

There is no reason why you couldn't learn to practice scientifically (i.e. draw from an evidence base, read scientific literature, evaluate your own work or that of others) or be involved with clinical audit and sevice evaluation. This is what some would consider being a practitioner-scholar. There may even by roles as a research therapist open to you where you can work as part of a RCT or similar.

However, the lack of doctorate would hinder you if you wanted to apply for your own grant or become a principle investigator. You wouldn't be eligible for schemes like the Wellcome Trust Fellowship, run a lab or find work at the higher levels of academia. You wouldn't be able to be the main supervisor for doctoral (PhD) students. That said, you could always do a PhD in addition to your CBT training though if you really wanted to create your own scientist-practitioner route.
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