Online therapy or remote psychology jobs

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Haze18
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Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2018 2:04 pm

Online therapy or remote psychology jobs

Post by Haze18 » Tue Mar 12, 2019 5:02 pm

Hello,

My dream is to be able to use Psychology to eventually work as a digital nomad, and be able to work from anywhere in the world as an online-based psychologist (instead of having a practice in a specific location). I have found a couple psychologists from the US and Germany who provide online video-based counselling and online therapy and they are digital nomads who travel year round. I've completed my undergraduate Psychology degree and am due to start a masters this September, eventually with the goal of completing a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. Do you think it would be possible to become a fully chartered clinical psychologist, and then provide (private) online therapy?

- do DClinPsy courses offer enough therapy training to provide this?
- does anyone else hope to be able to work remotely with psychology?!

Thank you!

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hawke
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Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2017 11:10 am

Re: Online therapy & online psychology jobs

Post by hawke » Tue Mar 12, 2019 5:18 pm

Sounds like a lovely and very achievable ambition!

The doctorate, as it stands, would qualify you to do CBT and one other type of therapy (which would depend on the uni). It would also give you lots of other skills in research and leadership. So the short answer is yes.

However if you only want to do online therapy, I would say you are much better off training as CBT therapist, which you could do privately or through NHS IAPT. Or even doing counselling or life coach training. The reason I say that is the doctorate is competitive and hard, and it doesn't sound like you are committed to the NHS or to using the full range of skills the doctorate would teach you. So partly for your own sake and partly for the NHS's sake it might be better to do a different qualification!

While online therapies are taking off, they are limited to specific models at the moment. For example, some universities would have psychodynamic as the second therapy strand on the doctorate. Our teachers don't even like us using laptops to take notes in class because it interferes with the relational experiential learning. I can't see practitioners embracing the Skype therapy sessions! So something less dependent on that face-to-face experience would be better suited to your needs.

hawke
Posts: 84
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2017 11:10 am

Re: Online therapy or remote psychology jobs

Post by hawke » Tue Mar 12, 2019 5:22 pm

Also just thinking about time scales - the doctorate would require you to have at least 1 year work experience, if not more realistically 2-3+. Most people are in their mid to late twenties by the time they start. Add on 3 years for the doctorate itself and you are looking at a long journey to achieve your dream.

Haze18
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Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2018 2:04 pm

Re: Online therapy & online psychology jobs

Post by Haze18 » Tue Mar 12, 2019 7:21 pm

hawke wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 5:18 pm
if you only want to do online therapy, I would say you are much better off training as CBT therapist, which you could do privately or through NHS IAPT. Or even doing counselling or life coach training.
Thanks so much for your response! You made a very valid point that's been on my mind a lot. I've looked into CBT, and my worry is that I would later regret not have studied the full breadth of clinical psych, and the variety of work that can be done with it. I also agree coaching could be a great idea and a faster route to being able to work online, and have seen a few MSc applied positive psychology & coaching courses which look interesting.

A Doctorate would allow me to also work in countries such as New Zealand where Clinical Psychologists are (currently) included on the list of jobs for visas, and allows the chance to do research work abroad should I chose to settle in specific countries for a year or two which I intend.

You're right - I'd probably be around 33-35 by the time I'm able to move to online work, I'm really hoping this would set me up for life instead of having the struggle in my mid 30's to chose to do a doctorate after all. Thank you for your perspective!

lakeland
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Re: Online therapy or remote psychology jobs

Post by lakeland » Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:57 am

Remember that clinical psychology isn't just about therapy as well, so if you only want to do therapy, then the breadth of clincial psychology training probably isn't relevant either.

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maven
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Re: Online therapy or remote psychology jobs

Post by maven » Wed Mar 13, 2019 12:43 pm

Bear in mind that online therapy you are competing with counsellors and therapists with much lower qualifications, so the expectations of cost per session from consumers are much lower, and they may not see the advantage of using a CP if the price is higher than the competition. CP training really isn't a time/cost effective route for delivering online therapy, and given training is funded by the NHS one of the variables weighed in who they select is experience in and commitment to the NHS. So I think there are numerous reasons that this isn't the right path to being a digital therapist, personally. But I think we are soon to have an advert from a digital provider, so you might be able to find out more from them.
Maven.

Wise men talk because they have something to say, fools because they have to say something - Plato
The fool thinks himself to be wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool - Shakespeare

AnsweringBell
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Re: Online therapy or remote psychology jobs

Post by AnsweringBell » Wed Mar 13, 2019 5:28 pm

Totally agreeing with Lakeland's point there; in the doctorate you cover supervising others, leadership, consultation etc on top of therapeutic work and skills across the lifespan... but if you were wanting to offer private therapy like you're talking about, you likely wouldn't need those same core competencies (i.e. working with children, or within learning disability). Additionally there's the huge research component.

Maybe don't just think about CBT, but there are a range of BACP accredited programmes following a number of different training modalities. You could collect a few and have a range of different therapies you could offer, to have multiple strings to your therapeutic bow.

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