Need some advice please: hate support work

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SarahAshley29
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Need some advice please: hate support work

Post by SarahAshley29 » Mon Sep 14, 2015 12:25 pm

A month ago, I started a Support Worker role in a residential care home for adults with Autism, and I hate it. One day last week I had my hair pulled harder and harder where the resident would not let go, and the next day a resident scratched my face, tried to bite me and pulled and bit my top. As well as this, I feel like the role mainly revolves around providing personal care, making food or cleaning rather than communicating with the residents. I do get to do this, and sometimes get to support them in going and and accessing the community but less so than other tasks. Whilst in this role, I've been working towards gaining a Care Qualification and after filling out workbooks etc, I am due to be observed/assessed which would probably last one shift, then I have achieved it.
I'm a bit stuck at the moment, because I recognize that I need the experience, and would also like to leave with the transferable qualification after the work that I have put into achieving it, but also dread going into work every day.

In terms of the academic side of things, I worked extremely hard during uni which I miss and have achieved:

Psychology BSc - 1st class honors (82.3% overall, first for every year and every assignment in 3rd year)
- British Psychology Society Prize for highest overall grade (prize includes application for free graduate membership for a year)
- Deans award for Excellent Academic Achievement
- Deans award for dissertation
- 95% in dissertation and presentation (concerning academic motivation)
- Submitted for publication
- Funded by university to individually present my dissertation research at international conference in London
- Finalist for 'Young Achiever' award in my area
- Mentioned in my area's newspaper for my academic achievements

In terms of experience I only have...

- Samaritans - 1 year during uni
- Support Worker for adults with Autism (f/t) - 1 month (present)

Not completely relevant - but Pharmacy Assistant (p/t) for 5 years before & during uni.

I guess my question is is it perhaps wise to just grit my teeth and stick this job out, or should I attempt to get experience in a job I may be happier in? If so, which experience should I realistically be applying for? I'm worried all support worker jobs will be similar to this. Is it too early to apply for AP roles? Thank you!

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JBoulton
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Re: Need some advice please

Post by JBoulton » Mon Sep 14, 2015 3:45 pm

It's definitely not too early to apply for AP posts. Your academic and Samaritans experience puts you in good stead. We recently recruited an assistant with a masters and no prior experience. It'll be more difficult, but every application and interview is all good experience.

Regarding your current role, that is generally not the norm (as far as I am aware) for support worker roles, though is perhaps more the norm when working in a residential environment with people with autism. I was a support worker for 4 years with young people with autism and I can defintiely relate to your experience - multiple restraints per day, being hit, kicked, bitten and plenty of personal care. It very much depends on the client group and the setting.

There are a variety of support worker type jobs available (drugs and alcohol services, Samaritans (and similar), support time recovery worker, neurodisability (ABI and similar), older age adults and youth offending teams) which will provide direct work with service users with differing levels of therapeutic input which should have much less risk of aggression. There isn't really a gold standard in what this experience should contain, it's mostly what you learn and take from it that is important when interviewing for AP posts/clinical doctorate.

You could also look at IAPT (psychological wellbeing practitioners), SALT assistants, OT assistants or other therapy related roles.

I have two conflicting pieces of advice. The first is, don't do this job if you hate it. There is nothing (or very little) you will learn by having your hair pulled that you won't learn elsewhere. You may also risk being turned off to the whole healthcare profession if you have such a negative experience of it.

The second piece of advice is to stick with it and see how you get on. I remember my first ever shift and not having a clue what to do, I felt like an incompetent moron - the first few aggressive incidents I witnessed, I stood there like a gawping lemon and did nothing to help.

I hope that is in someway useful!
Last edited by JBoulton on Mon Sep 14, 2015 4:06 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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ClaireEmma
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Re: Need some advice please

Post by ClaireEmma » Mon Sep 14, 2015 3:59 pm

Just wanted to quickly add that not all support worker posts are like this. I worked as a healthcare assistant on an adolescent ward and it was extremely valuable in terms of learning how to develop therapeutic relationships, engaging people in therapeutic activities, learning more about the role of a CP on a ward, MDT working, getting an insight into the experience of young people with quite severe difficulties and so much more.

Although it's not impossible that you could gain an AP post at this stage, realistically you will be up against people with a considerable amount of clinical experience, so I think it would also be worth looking at support worker posts in other areas too. In addition, you could look for research posts, particularly ones that involve contact with service users.

Prosopon
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Re: Need some advice please

Post by Prosopon » Mon Sep 14, 2015 4:48 pm

SarahAshley29 wrote:I feel like the role mainly revolves around providing personal care, making food or cleaning rather than communicating with the residents. I do get to do this, and sometimes get to support them in going and and accessing the community but less so than other tasks.
This has been my experience in my first social care job too, working in a supported-living environment with adults with autism and learning disabilities. I feel like it is a completely different job to what was advertised and that really I have been working as a glorified maid. Still, when I leave next month I will have stuck it out for over seven months (though on 21 hours a week) and I feel I have a lot of experiences to reflect on.

I am glad to be moving on and started looking for another position before my probationary period was even up as I was not enjoying the role at all. Unfortunately it has taken me a long time to get through the pre-employment checks for my new job and so I have had to stay in the current one longer than I wanted to!

Only you know how well you are coping and what kind of impact it has having on you. To me it sounds like it would be a good idea to find something else. Though if you can wait until after you have achieved the qualification, that might be good. Best of luck whatever you decide!
"Is this real? Or has this been happening inside my head?"

“Of course it is happening inside your head, Harry, but why on earth should that mean that it is not real?”

~From Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.

lingua_franca
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Re: Need some advice please

Post by lingua_franca » Mon Sep 14, 2015 9:44 pm

Prosopon wrote:
SarahAshley29 wrote:I feel like the role mainly revolves around providing personal care, making food or cleaning rather than communicating with the residents. I do get to do this, and sometimes get to support them in going and and accessing the community but less so than other tasks.
This has been my experience in my first social care job too, working in a supported-living environment with adults with autism and learning disabilities. I feel like it is a completely different job to what was advertised and that really I have been working as a glorified maid. Still, when I leave next month I will have stuck it out for over seven months (though on 21 hours a week) and I feel I have a lot of experiences to reflect on.
Just to add another perspective...I'd say that providing personal care and making food are perfect opportunities to communicate with residents. I built up a wonderful rapport with a young adult who had severe learning disabilities and who was non-verbal because when I helped her to bath at night I would sing. She used to be laughing from start to finish and she would whack the water or the side of the bath in a rhythm. Most of the time I couldn't tell the rhythm, but occasionally I could hear that she was remembering a particular song, so I would switch to that.

This is communication. Support work is full of these opportunities. Where I worked each person had one night of the week when they were responsible for cooking or some other household task. Of course we had to tailor it to them - some of the most independent young adults could practically make a full meal with very little supervision and guidance (one was better than me!), others could wash and dry dishes with just an occasional prompt to check that everything was clean, but the young woman I mentioned above and many others could not do any of these things. So when it was her night for washing up I gave her some non-breakable crockery to dry, only one or two pieces, while I did the rest of the work. And again, while we were doing it, I sang and danced. She was entranced - first time anyone has ever enjoyed my singing ;) - and in between songs I would ask questions, questions that she might or might not be able to understand. "Time to tidy up. Does this" (holding up the Fairy Liquid) "go in the oven?" Laughter from her. "In the fridge?" More laughter. "Then where?" She pointed to the sink. Over time it became clear to me just how much she was understanding.

Challenging behaviour is in itself a form of communication - if some one is biting or scratching, then something is wrong and the person doesn't have any other way to say it. So what could it be? Support work is a very good place to begin thinking about these types of questions and to start considering people's behaviour in a respectfully curious way. Sometimes I think people fall into the trap of assuming that if they're not doing something that's obviously therapy-related there is no potential in the job, and unfortunately I have seen support workers who will brush a person's hair in the way they might clean an inanimate object - no real interaction at all, as though they don't see the point or don't realise that interaction is even possible with someone who has this level of impairment. Some places foster this attitude more than others and can be discouraging to arrive at as a newcomer, but in your position I would stick it out for a while longer and see what you can learn.
"Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
"Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
Piglet was comforted by this.
- A.A. Milne.

Prosopon
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Re: Need some advice please

Post by Prosopon » Mon Sep 14, 2015 10:29 pm

lingua_franca wrote:
Prosopon wrote:
SarahAshley29 wrote:I feel like the role mainly revolves around providing personal care, making food or cleaning rather than communicating with the residents. I do get to do this, and sometimes get to support them in going and and accessing the community but less so than other tasks.
This has been my experience in my first social care job too, working in a supported-living environment with adults with autism and learning disabilities. I feel like it is a completely different job to what was advertised and that really I have been working as a glorified maid. Still, when I leave next month I will have stuck it out for over seven months (though on 21 hours a week) and I feel I have a lot of experiences to reflect on.
Just to add another perspective...I'd say that providing personal care and making food are perfect opportunities to communicate with residents. I built up a wonderful rapport with a young adult who had severe learning disabilities and who was non-verbal because when I helped her to bath at night I would sing. She used to be laughing from start to finish and she would whack the water or the side of the bath in a rhythm. Most of the time I couldn't tell the rhythm, but occasionally I could hear that she was remembering a particular song, so I would switch to that.

This is communication. Support work is full of these opportunities. Where I worked each person had one night of the week when they were responsible for cooking or some other household task. Of course we had to tailor it to them - some of the most independent young adults could practically make a full meal with very little supervision and guidance (one was better than me!), others could wash and dry dishes with just an occasional prompt to check that everything was clean, but the young woman I mentioned above and many others could not do any of these things. So when it was her night for washing up I gave her some non-breakable crockery to dry, only one or two pieces, while I did the rest of the work. And again, while we were doing it, I sang and danced. She was entranced - first time anyone has ever enjoyed my singing ;) - and in between songs I would ask questions, questions that she might or might not be able to understand. "Time to tidy up. Does this" (holding up the Fairy Liquid) "go in the oven?" Laughter from her. "In the fridge?" More laughter. "Then where?" She pointed to the sink. Over time it became clear to me just how much she was understanding.

Challenging behaviour is in itself a form of communication - if some one is biting or scratching, then something is wrong and the person doesn't have any other way to say it. So what could it be? Support work is a very good place to begin thinking about these types of questions and to start considering people's behaviour in a respectfully curious way. Sometimes I think people fall into the trap of assuming that if they're not doing something that's obviously therapy-related there is no potential in the job, and unfortunately I have seen support workers who will brush a person's hair in the way they might clean an inanimate object - no real interaction at all, as though they don't see the point or don't realise that interaction is even possible with someone who has this level of impairment. Some places foster this attitude more than others and can be discouraging to arrive at as a newcomer, but in your position I would stick it out for a while longer and see what you can learn.
I agree with a lot of what you have said here and I have built up an amazing relationship with one of the people I have been supporting, to the point where he spoke to me about something that was deeply personal to him. To have someone who struggles to communicate open up to me like that was incredibly special to me and is an experience that is going to stay with me for the rest of my life.

However, I think it does depend on the service you work for. With the guy I have mentioned I was able to develop this kind of relationship with no support from anyone else because he is sociable and likes interaction, and we have just seemed to naturally connect. But I worked with another person who is pretty unresponsive to others and extremely hard to engage. I repeatedly asked for advice on how to interact with this person because I felt so out of my depth (having never worked with somebody like that before) but nobody was interested in advising me or helping me develop a relationship with him. Also, they just prefer to do things for him as it is easier. I hate this attitude and wanted to support him to have more control in his life. Unfortunately I wasn't able to do this much as I had no guidance on interacting with him and no support for what I was trying to achieve. Therefore a lot of the time I just ended up doing things for him like everybody else, which is why I began to feel like a maid, rather than a support worker.

So if SarahAshley29 works for a company like this, then I can see where she is coming from! I think you have made a lot of good points though. I tried to make the most of my experience but working for that company was completely demoralising and it was better for me to get out. I don't know if it is the same for Sarah but if so, it might be better to find something else.
"Is this real? Or has this been happening inside my head?"

“Of course it is happening inside your head, Harry, but why on earth should that mean that it is not real?”

~From Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.

ChipChip
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Re: Need some advice please

Post by ChipChip » Tue Sep 15, 2015 4:17 pm

Hi SarahAshley29,

I was going to write something along the lines of what lingua_franca said but she completely hit the nail on the head, please do not underestimate how supporting someone to complete the smallest of tasks can be extremely valuable to them, rewarding to you and can help you to develop a supportive, positive relationship. The things that you describe are the things that we take for granted to be able to do each day, when I was a support worker I wanted the person I was supporting to have fun and enjoy their time with me - don't get me wrong I've been at the wrong end of some very difficult challenging behaviour, but supporting someone means taking the good with the bad. Support work is not an easy job and challenging behaviour can be very difficult to cope with but once you have developed a trusting relationship with someone the positive interactions and communications that you get in return are the best reward you could ask for.

In my opinion as you have only been there for one month, you have not been there anywhere near long enough to have developed a good knowledge of and relationship with the people that you support (because this comes through time and experience as does any relationship). Unless you hate it with a passion and it is making you ill I would stick it out, give it at least three months and see how you feel once you are more experienced - if you still hate it, you gave it a good go and won't be seen as a job-hopper. If you feel your interests are not in autism and you feel you would prefer something else, then it might not be worth sticking with - not all support worker jobs are like this (although be aware that autism, learning disabilities and acquired brain injury support worker jobs might).

I would also say that if you have a manager or mentor available to you (I know in the company I work for we have workforce mentors) or team members that you can rely on, discuss your concerns with them - you will find that your colleagues are the best form of support (some obviously will not be!) but if you need support, answers or have concerns please discuss them with anyone who you feel comfortable with within the company.

You obviously have excellent academic achievements under your belt, don't underestimate the value that you might have for the company and the options there might be for you to develop not just now but in the future. Are there clinical staff that you could spend time with or offer to volunteer with to give you a better understanding of what the MDT is working towards with particular individuals?

Having your hair-pulled is distressing and is the one thing that I really dislike - does the company provide PPE (hats?) for the person that you support that pulls hair? Did you get a sufficient debrief after the incidents you were involved in? (I wouldn't be surprised if you said no).

This forum could do with a challenging behaviour support group thread!

Chip x

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Pink
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Re: Need some advice please

Post by Pink » Wed Sep 16, 2015 7:38 am

Hey,

Just a very brief post. Lingua Franca is (as always) totally right about the value you can offer to very vulnerable people in a role like that, and how a thoughtful and respectful support worker who cares about their role can make a huge difference. And, as always, it's good experience, stuff you can reflect on, etc. I just wanted to give you permission to hate it and leave though! We're not all cut out for all types of work, and I absolutely loathed my six month LD placement on training-I hated every second of it. That was a very different role from a support worker (no-one was pulling my hair and I'd have quit the first day if they had): as a trainee CP I had lots of autonomy and space to work with the systems around vulnerable clients to improve their lives, it was valuable work and work that made a difference, I learned lots of new things and enhanced some skills and got very passionate about social justice and was humbled both by my clients and the dedication of the staff around them, and left with a deep respect for people who can do this work, but ultimately I found it depressing and dispiriting work and could not wait for the placement to be over. I've never worked in LD before or since, and that's ok-I am glad I had the opportunity but it's just not where my clinical skill set or area of interest lies. No one gave me permission to say this during training, it was a thing that couldn't be talked about, and some of my trainee colleagues were absolutely passionate about the work (and totally uninterested in/intimated by, my preferred client groups of high risk/attachment/DSH/trauma etc). I remember taking it to therapy and just feeling so damn guilty, it's so much part of my values set to try to be compassionate, ethical, committed, and although I still gave my placement and clients everything I could and did a good job I just could not feel that connection or passion that I feel for every other area I have worked in. Ultimately, I think that's ok-it just wasn't my field, and there are others who could not do what I do now. That diversity is part of the beauty of CP. If you don't like it, find another support worker job for rethink or mind or in a children's home or something, go work with psychosis or trauma or homelessness or substance misuse or kids in care-you'll learn so much of value and you'll find your best self in the work, not just be ground down by doing something that is not ultimately rewarding for you personally, no matter how meaningful it is.
Good luck with it,

Pink
Kintsukuroi: 'to repair with gold'. the art of repairing pottery with gold or silver lacquer and understanding that the piece is more beautiful for having been broken.

@Sushipink22

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Geishawife
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Re: Need some advice please

Post by Geishawife » Tue Sep 22, 2015 9:24 am

That's a really interesting point, Pink, about being allowed to hate an area of work. I wonder if that could make a new thread entirely on its own?? I DETESTED every second of my child placement! And, like you, found no outlet for expressing that within my cohort. It was as if I was some kind of monster for not enjoying working with children! The reality is, we are all suited to different things and find fulfillment in different things. There's no shame in acknowledging that.

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ell
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Re: Need some advice please

Post by ell » Mon Sep 28, 2015 11:12 am

Geishawife wrote:That's a really interesting point, Pink, about being allowed to hate an area of work. I wonder if that could make a new thread entirely on its own?? I DETESTED every second of my child placement! And, like you, found no outlet for expressing that within my cohort. It was as if I was some kind of monster for not enjoying working with children! The reality is, we are all suited to different things and find fulfillment in different things. There's no shame in acknowledging that.
This post made me laugh, GeishaWife! While I did not hate my child placement (amazing supervisors, adolescents actually OK as they are a bit like adults), I have no interest in working with children, and my cohort often hear my refrain of "I hate children" (I exaggerate slightly, but generally I don't like being around children much). I very much own that perspective, and don't feel I need to hide it. However, I think that's something about me enjoying being a bit different. Also, my cohort enjoys being made up of people with different passions - makes us more individual.

I do think it's a pity that some areas of work are so much more popular than others. Again, my cohort often have to listen to me rant about so few people seem to want to work with older adults, and more recently I've added LD to that rant. Interestingly, when I started my first placement (CAMHS), I was asked about my interests and I had to be honest and say OA was my passion, though I said that I had enjoyed my previous experience in CAMHS and was looking forward to learning more etc etc etc. My supervisors then half-jokingly said "perhaps we'll convert you to CAMHS over the placement!". I found this slightly frustrating, as while I understood their desire to convey their own passions, I thought that it seemed a bit unfair to try and 'steal' someone from OA!

Perhaps I am seeing this as having to be in camps, where actually it is more complex. I do think it is important to talk about, and reflect on, fears and dislikes in placements - chances are there is someone else who has similar feelings. Also, it's important to identify what it is that makes you hate the placement or job - is it the organisation, your supervisor, the feelings the client group brings up in you, the timing in your training journey etc?

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Geishawife
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Re: Need some advice please

Post by Geishawife » Mon Sep 28, 2015 12:07 pm

ell wrote:Again, my cohort often have to listen to me rant about so few people seem to want to work with older adults,
That was me more years ago now than I care to remember!!! Nothing ever persuaded me away from OA work (LD came a closish 2nd) and it is still my passion.

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ell
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Re: Need some advice please

Post by ell » Mon Sep 28, 2015 12:33 pm

Geishawife wrote:
ell wrote:Again, my cohort often have to listen to me rant about so few people seem to want to work with older adults,
That was me more years ago now than I care to remember!!! Nothing ever persuaded me away from OA work (LD came a closish 2nd) and it is still my passion.
I'm the same! I'd never worked with people with LD until my LD placement recently - and LD nearly stole my heart! Nothing has ever come close in interesting me, and it was a pleasant surprise. About to embark on my specialist placement in OA though, so I made a choice.

I've got such a passion for working with people who, by their very identity, are disadvantaged groups in society. While adults and CYP with mental health problems are very much stigmatised in society, adults and CYP themselves are not disadvantaged. That's a clumsy and simple way of putting things I know, but there is a difference I think.

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Re: Need some advice please

Post by Esuma » Mon Sep 28, 2015 1:45 pm

I loved my time working in LD actually too :) I'm not an AP or trainee but a SW and when I moved from ABI (an area I absolutely loved) to LD I was quite pessimistic, I think I had my own prejudices about what working in LD would be. But when I actually got settled I realised how many unique challenges I would face and really loved it, and now I could happily work with LD as an AP or if / when I become a CP. It really made me rethink things. I'm hopefully going to be working with inpatient mental health soon as I really wanted to get some experience there so I'm going into it with an open mind - I always pictured this more than anything when I thought as CP but who knows if I'll enjoy it or not! ? I do know though that I probably won't enjoy CAMHS as never being around children much I'm pretty awkward around children and young people - hopefully that comes with time :oops:

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Re: Need some advice please

Post by lingua_franca » Mon Sep 28, 2015 10:09 pm

ell wrote: I've got such a passion for working with people who, by their very identity, are disadvantaged groups in society. While adults and CYP with mental health problems are very much stigmatised in society, adults and CYP themselves are not disadvantaged. That's a clumsy and simple way of putting things I know, but there is a difference I think.
I understand what you mean. LD is one of my major areas of interest, particularly dementia in LD, partly because of this reason you give. But I think children are marginalised in more subtle ways (although in some settings it becomes much more apparent than others). My PhD research involves children and young people in conflict zones and I have found that almost all the literature is rescue-orientated: it treats them as traumatised subjects in need of saving or being put through peace education programs, and there is very little examining the role they themselves can play in peacemaking or community rehabilitation efforts. The tacit assumption is that they have nothing to contribute; they should just receive the contributions of adults. In less extreme settings, I've noticed that adults get away with behaviour all the time that would result in a telling-off if it were done by a child. The marginalisation is certainly not as extreme as that faced by a person with LD, but it's there.
"Suppose a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?"
"Suppose it didn't," said Pooh, after careful thought.
Piglet was comforted by this.
- A.A. Milne.

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ell
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Re: Need some advice please

Post by ell » Mon Sep 28, 2015 10:30 pm

lingua_franca wrote:
ell wrote: I've got such a passion for working with people who, by their very identity, are disadvantaged groups in society. While adults and CYP with mental health problems are very much stigmatised in society, adults and CYP themselves are not disadvantaged. That's a clumsy and simple way of putting things I know, but there is a difference I think.
I understand what you mean. LD is one of my major areas of interest, particularly dementia in LD, partly because of this reason you give. But I think children are marginalised in more subtle ways (although in some settings it becomes much more apparent than others). My PhD research involves children and young people in conflict zones and I have found that almost all the literature is rescue-orientated: it treats them as traumatised subjects in need of saving or being put through peace education programs, and there is very little examining the role they themselves can play in peacemaking or community rehabilitation efforts. The tacit assumption is that they have nothing to contribute; they should just receive the contributions of adults. In less extreme settings, I've noticed that adults get away with behaviour all the time that would result in a telling-off if it were done by a child. The marginalisation is certainly not as extreme as that faced by a person with LD, but it's there.
You speak wisely as ever lingua, and I do agree. As I said, it's a simple, sweeping distinction, based in a Western peaceful society context. Being older is valued more in some cultures than others, so it's quite context specific.

I also like working with people where hope is in pretty short supply. Something about being able to offer something when things aren't going to get 'better' in many ways. It's hard to explain. Maybe takes the pressure off a bit. I can't cure dementia, or get rid of an LD, but I can do something to help someone live well, and that can be small changes. Interesting to reflect on really.

Anyway, derailing the thread now...!

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