What was the point in studying psychology?

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maven
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Re: What was the point in studying psychology?

Post by maven »

I understand that sometimes it is nice to rant, and to feel the world is stacked against you, but don't let that override the actual facts when making your career decisions. I just read that last post, and it seems like another example of someone trying to skew the facts to their personal experience, and make external attributions about why they are finding it more difficult than the majority of successful candidates.

So for the record: The typical time from graduating with GBC to gaining a training place is 3 years. Most people get on within their first 3 applications. People who take longer than 5 years who are successful often chose to divert to do a Phd, start a family or try another career pathway. There is zero evidence that people who take longer to get on training find the course easier or feel more prepared or go on to be better CPs. Most people would say they got on when they were ready. And the selection process, is broadly successful in selecting people who pass the course and are retained in the CP workforce, even if it doesn't take on every candidate who could have been a CP. But it is a doctoral level training, and therefore selects candidates who are very academically able, and will be able to pass the taught and research thesis components as well as the placements. So getting a good mark in your degree is critical, and getting a 2:2 really stacks the odds against you.
Maven.

Wise men talk because they have something to say, fools because they have to say something - Plato
The fool thinks himself to be wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool - Shakespeare
RJParker
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Re: What was the point in studying psychology?

Post by RJParker »

maven wrote: Wed Apr 07, 2021 12:42 amThere is zero evidence that people who take longer to get on training find the course easier or feel more prepared or go on to be better CPs.
Is that because there is zero research into it? I've not looked but I can't imagine it has been extensively examined.
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maven
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Re: What was the point in studying psychology?

Post by maven »

RJParker wrote: Wed Apr 07, 2021 4:03 pm
maven wrote: Wed Apr 07, 2021 12:42 amThere is zero evidence that people who take longer to get on training find the course easier or feel more prepared or go on to be better CPs.
Is that because there is zero research into it? I've not looked but I can't imagine it has been extensively examined.
I don't know of any, but that seemed to be the assertion the previous poster was making, when s/he said "those who take longer to get onto the doctorate are probably better prepared with more maturity, further qualifications, life experience, experience of overcoming adversity, etc". In terms of anecdotal reports on the forum over the 15 years we've been here, older and more experienced candidates seem to report similar concerns about coping with training, and plenty of those who progress quickly from undergrad to doctorate do just fine, so there doesn't seem to be any pattern of the kind claimed. We do often see good reasons that some candidates who feel very hard done by after years of repeated rejections do not get onto training, and hear back surprisingly often about forum users who have been problematic here also being problematic in their professional lives.
Maven.

Wise men talk because they have something to say, fools because they have to say something - Plato
The fool thinks himself to be wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool - Shakespeare
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