Do any of the courses offer an unofficial part-time route?

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laffytaffy999
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Do any of the courses offer an unofficial part-time route?

Post by laffytaffy999 »

I know Lancaster has an offical part-time route but relocating that far would be incredibly difficult for me and also not great if there is only one course option!
I'm currently London based, and could do the London courses + about an hour so Oxford, Birmingham etc. Any of these courses unofficially allow part-time? Or is it a case of having to get through the first year full-time(I've seen a few former threads about going part-time being allowed after mat leave from 2nd year)?
I have a disability that makes working full-time difficult.
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Geishawife
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Re: Do any of the courses offer an unofficial part-time route?

Post by Geishawife »

The short answer is no. With the exception of Lancaster, none of the courses offer a part time option, officially or unofficially. That said, given you have a disability courses might be able to make reasonable adjustments (which would probably have to be agreed with the employing trust if it meant you being employed longer than the standard 3 years). My best advice would be to approach the courses you are interested in and ask them directly what their position would be. Courses are usually very open to being asked questions prior to applications being made and it is probably better to hear it straight from the horse's mouth. Good luck.
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maven
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Re: Do any of the courses offer an unofficial part-time route?

Post by maven »

I think it would be misleading to think of "unofficial part-time routes" to clinical training - that would imply it is some unadvertised option that is in fact available through some dubious pathway. That isn't the case. All courses apart from the Lancaster one are full time.

However, as Geishawife says, there is a right for all employees to ask for reasonable adjustments to disabilities or parenting/caring responsibilities, that the NHS is better than most at observing. This has sometimes allowed trainees to negotiate a longer/thinner path through training, where the same number of teaching and placement days are completed, but over an extended period (just as a maternity leave would allow time off after the birth, but require adding extra time to the end of training so all the components are completed).

I don't think it would be a good idea to apply in the hope that this could later be negotiated, if you don't feel able to work full-time (as training is intense and adjustments are individually negotiated and not guaranteed to work out as you hope) but as Geishawife says, if you have a recognised disability you could ask whether they are able to discuss the type of reasonable adjustments you would require, and then make an informed choice whether or not to apply.
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laffytaffy999
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Re: Do any of the courses offer an unofficial part-time route?

Post by laffytaffy999 »

maven wrote: Fri Jul 15, 2022 7:22 pm I think it would be misleading to think of "unofficial part-time routes" to clinical training - that would imply it is some unadvertised option that is in fact available through some dubious pathway. That isn't the case. All courses apart from the Lancaster one are full time.

However, as Geishawife says, there is a right for all employees to ask for reasonable adjustments to disabilities or parenting/caring responsibilities, that the NHS is better than most at observing. This has sometimes allowed trainees to negotiate a longer/thinner path through training, where the same number of teaching and placement days are completed, but over an extended period (just as a maternity leave would allow time off after the birth, but require adding extra time to the end of training so all the components are completed).

I don't think it would be a good idea to apply in the hope that this could later be negotiated, if you don't feel able to work full-time (as training is intense and adjustments are individually negotiated and not guaranteed to work out as you hope) but as Geishawife says, if you have a recognised disability you could ask whether they are able to discuss the type of reasonable adjustments you would require, and then make an informed choice whether or not to apply.
Sorry if my phrasing wasn't great. I didn't mean that there was a dubious pathway - I was just talking from my experience of my MSc. I ended up switching to my second choice which had an official part-time route as my first choice said that I couldn't go down to part-time (the course start coincided with an unexpected new medical condition for me). However, my friends who stayed on my first-choice course said if I had stuck it out for a bit longer they did allow them to space out assignments (and complete some assignments the following year). Unofficially, allowing them to complete it part-time - they just needed to prove that they were good students first before they were offered that flexibility.
I do agree, that being upfront about needs and being confident things will work in terms of adjustments is a much better way to go as there is no stress about whether things will be allowed or not (and I am so happy with my MSc - I have been so well supported and have a fantastic placement with a lot of face-to-face supervision from a clinical psychologist - whereas last year placements were online).

A longer, thinner path sounds great but I don't know if it's a case of you are expected to be able to train full time and only if you start to struggle during the course will this be an option (my experience at my undergrad was that my department were awful with me and, only did they begrudgingly put into place things that my disabled student allowance report had requested from the get-go once my health had already worsened and I requested to suspend my studies) but I guess as you said, the only way to know is to talk to course providers about adjustments and see what their attitudes are.
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miriam
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Re: Do any of the courses offer an unofficial part-time route?

Post by miriam »

I think we'd all hope that there is a genuine willingness to make reasonable adjustments to disability, but it would be helpful to hear from anyone who has experienced the reality. I seem to recall Astra having an adjusted timetable but that was a combination of being a new parent and having both her own physical dysability and her child's special needs, so it may not be a representative example.
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Petetyerman
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Re: Do any of the courses offer an unofficial part-time route?

Post by Petetyerman »

if you have a disability that means you would take longer to complete the course then it can be extended as an adjustment for disability.I am aware of a case when a course was extended by 15 months as adjustments were needed and/or not sorted out promptly.HEE who funds the course made no objection and fully funded the extension. The dclin courses are so full that extension for disability adjustments will almost always be necessary.
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