Non-UK applicants for 2010 entry / current trainees

Discuss applications to the clearing house (and to courses that are not in the clearing house system), screening assessments, interviews, reserve lists, places, etc. here
KimB
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2008 2:20 pm
Location: Sweden

Post by KimB » Sun Nov 08, 2009 12:51 pm

Regarding the application fee. I have been in contact with CH and they confirmed that you are able to send cash together with your application.
//Kim

arabesques
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Sep 22, 2009 10:40 am

Post by arabesques » Sun Nov 08, 2009 1:18 pm

that's great, thank you so much!

KimB
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2008 2:20 pm
Location: Sweden

Post by KimB » Sun Nov 08, 2009 1:24 pm

"Regarding the registration fee for the clinical psychology courses. The sterling bank draft should be made out to the University of Leeds or alternatively you can put sterling cash in with your application form".
//Kim

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dannythemenace
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Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 7:28 pm
Location: London City

Post by dannythemenace » Sun Nov 08, 2009 1:31 pm

Dorothy wrote:You have to pay a lot of money to train as a psychoanalyitic psychotherapist. It is a long haul too, and you need to be in therapy usually more than once a week. Trainings vary and it really depends on what models interest you, a training in any psychotherapy, will be in one model, ie CBT, CAT, Transactional anlaysis, etc. So you kinda have to pin your nail on the mast, at least initally. It is not unusual for people to have a private practice, but it is unusual for NHS trained clinical psychologists to only work privately, but not impossible.

If you want to be a private therapist, it would be prudent to train on a BACP or UKCP accredited course.

If you only want to provide therapy (and that is not all of what a clinical psychologist does) counselling psychology may be an option for you, you would learn about and practice more than one model of therapy. But it costs money too, and there are far fewer training places I think.

A private practice incurs a lot of logistical difficulties, supervision, reception (?), and if you are seeing clients with a lot of difficulties, say those diagnosed with a personality disorder there will be some safety considerations and that may get quite difficult in a private setting. That is why generally, the image of private practice is providing therapy for the 'worried well' as has been mentioned before, nothing wrong with that per se, it is just a leap from the ethos of the NHS.
do you know anything about the training the The Institute of Psychoanalysis offers?

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Dr.Dot
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Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 7:14 pm
Location: Yellow brick road.

Post by Dr.Dot » Sun Nov 08, 2009 1:52 pm

Nope, no more than I could find out on the internet anyway! I am a trainee clinical psychologist, it's not really my area.
Dorothy: Now which way do we go?

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dannythemenace
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Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 7:28 pm
Location: London City

Post by dannythemenace » Sun Nov 08, 2009 4:06 pm

I have to add that of course I really nike the NHS idea and it is important that clinical psychologists do what they do what what people they help however. psychotherapists do treat multiple personality and so on...

I think the so called "everyday problems" of patients one would treat in a normal practice and to give that chance to people is extremely important and not only treat hardcore cases!
Last edited by miriam on Thu Dec 19, 2019 12:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Note: there is a lot of medicalising and pejorative language in this post, which we do not recommend

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dannythemenace
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Location: London City

Post by dannythemenace » Mon Nov 09, 2009 5:33 pm

I read the book which was referenced here in the forum called "What is clinical psychology"

and I now have a much clearer idea of what clinical psych is and what they do. And I have to admit I like it hehe

blan09
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Joined: Thu Oct 22, 2009 1:58 pm
Location: UK

Post by blan09 » Wed Nov 11, 2009 1:14 am

Thank you Miriam and w013 for your explanation of NHS experience, it has been really inspiring and very helpful for me today.
In that context. So, I think the NHS commitment and experience part of the expectations is particularly relevant for non-native applicants, and is one of the reasons that it is almost unheard of to get a place on clinical training if you are not currently living and working in the UK.

I don't think of it as a rigid "you must have worked at least 12 months in the NHS" but more as "you must demonstrate significant experience of, and commitment to, the NHS" which would most easily be fulfilled by having worked substantively in the NHS. Therefore, there are alternatives, but these are probably not possible to achieve outside of the UK.

I think w013's wording sums up the fact that this isn't a protectionist tick-box requirement, but a fundamental question of shared values (which I also hold myself).
I think I was feeling a bit stuck, as I wasn't managing to "get the NHS experience - AP and IAPT and SW posts etc" . I focused on that as a big obstacle and I questioned whether I can try to send my DClinPsy application this year.

After reading your posts tonight, I am able to see my situation differently and I am able to use divergent thinking a bit more again. I feel empowered to reflect creatively on my broad life and professional experience (including 10 years of life in the UK). And hopefully I will find clearer words for writing my DClinPsy application, as I will be able to better frame and describe my experience - as well as to express my desire to learn and to be open to the new experiences. I share NHS values and I did lots of work alongside NHS while working in charities with adults with LD.

It is so good to see that there are different ways of gaining experience and that there is not "the one right answer". Thank you!

tpoorun
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:41 am

Coming to the UK as an international student

Post by tpoorun » Sun Nov 15, 2009 12:44 pm

Thanks for the views and advice guys. I am moving from South Africa to the U.K. next year (to be with my boyfriend who just moved to London) and I plan to apply for the DClinPsych in the coming years.

These are my qualifications so far;
1. B.A. Psychology and Industrial & Organisational Psychology
2. B.A. Hons. Industrial & Organisational Psychology
3. M.A. Research Industrial & Organisational Psychology

I hadn't realised how difficult it is get into the Doctorate until I started my research a few days ago! Even with my excellent grades and experience, it will impossible for me to secure a place in the program right now.

Therefore, I am planning to do an MSc. in a psychology related field, probably research or neuroscience, do some volunteering at the same time and hopefully secure a job as a research assistant or assistant psychologist afterwards THEN apply for the doctorate.

On the other hand, I would be able to qualify from South Africa in the next three years as a clinical psychologist because I have a strong application relevant to the South African context. Ah the things one does when in love :?

I am hoping that I can show the universities that I am dedicated to working in the NHS by gaining experience in the system and probably doing NHS-relevant research. What I find particularly difficult is that I don't have any contacts or networks in the U.K., unlike in S.A., which makes it tough to get the information you need and secure positions.

I've already applied for the GBC and I'm waiting for results. It's such a tough and stressful process but it's encouraging to find that other people did succeed to achieve their goal!

tpoorun
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:41 am

Which universities take in non-EU students?

Post by tpoorun » Sun Nov 15, 2009 12:57 pm

sarum wrote:Hi KimB,

If you're planning on applying for training, however, I'd suggest clarifying your application with the individual universities' guidance, as it varies. For example, some universities will only accept trainees who are eligible for "home fees", i.e. have resided in the UK for a certain period of time. Other universities require that trainees are either UK or EU citizens and they will not consider non-EU applicants due to their funding arrangements and the liklihood of trainees staying in the UK after completion of training. This is understandable, as why would the NHS fund a trainee who is intending to return back to their country of origin? And a very few number of universities will consider international (non-EU) applicants.

I'm starting training this September after 4 years of gaining work experience in the UK (both voluntary and paid), and I'd also suggest that it's very important for a non-UK applicant to be able to demonstrate commitment to working in both the NHS and the UK upon completion of training - this is very explicitly stated on the Clearing House website.

I hope this thread continues as I'm really curious to learn how many other non-UK applicants/trainees are out there! :wink:
Thanks for the info Sarum. I am wondering which universities take in non-EU students? I have emailed all of them and got negative responses except for the University of Birmingham which said that they may consider my application.

I think the best way forward for a non-EU student would be to get their visas sorted out, hopefully obtain either a post-study permit or a Tier 1 visa. The way I understand it, the employers are extremely reluctant to sponsor internationals.

However my communications with the NHS were very positive. They said that once I am working in the NHS, there would be no discrimination based on my nationality so I can train and study as any other U.K./E.U. citizen (though I have to pay the difference between the U.K./E.U. fee status and international fee status). What I am worried about is whether the universities would not consider my application in the same way as other students? I am hoping that my working for a few years in the NHS and thus showing my commitment, I would not be rejected.

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