Educational Psychology

The place to ask about degree courses, conversion courses, masters, PhD or other qualifications. Discuss specific courses, their pros and cons, the content, the application process, different institutions, how to fund them, etc. Includes advice if you have a 2:2 and questions on transcripts
Post Reply
tasha_b26
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Nov 13, 2008 2:02 pm

Educational Psychology

Post by tasha_b26 » Mon Feb 16, 2009 11:09 am

Hi everyone

I have been trying to find information on Educational Psychology and the doctorate course (ideally a similar forum to ClinPsy!) but there just does not seem to be the same amount of info out there. What I really want to know is:

-Is the route to an Educational Psychology doctorate the same as Clinical in terms of length of relevent experience, competitiveness, application process, and also job prospects at the end of it all?

I guess what im trying to do is to directly compare the two. If anyone has an insight into the subject i'd be grateful for any info

Thanks alot

User avatar
choirgirl
Posts: 1440
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 9:41 am
Location: Midlands

Post by choirgirl » Mon Feb 16, 2009 12:19 pm

Well, I'm a Trainee Educational Psychologist, currently in Year 1 of the doctorate, so I guess that makes me best qualified to answer AFAIK :wink:

Yes, the route to the EP doctorate is pretty much as competitive as the CP equivalent. Since the change to the training route (which used to be PGCE + teaching experience + Masters = qualification), there's much more scope for accruing experience working with children and young people [CYP], so in that sense the world's your lobster as far as how you go about getting it is concerned. As a 'for instance', there are 10 of us in my cohort - 5 former teachers (4 Primary/Early Years & 1 special school), 1 Learning Mentor and 4 Assistant/Graduate Psychologists (although each person has got additional experience in other areas to supplement their 'main'/most recent job).

The youngest person in my cohort is about 24, with 2-3 years experience pst-undergrad, the oldest is about 35, with 13 years as a teacher behind her (& psychology degree via Open University). As with ClinP, it's not necessarily how many boxes you can tick in terms of range of experience, it's how well you reflect on it and can demonstrate that you have actively learned from it in ways which are applicable to being a trainee.

The application process is just as draining and nerve-wracking as the CP route, and follows a similar time-scale: applications need to be in by about Christmas, interviews are happening now (and for the next month or so), then offers which have to be accepted by the start of April, then a couple of weeks of the whole rigmarole of reserve lists and obsessing about whether you've moved up one place, before final deadline for accepting offers.

As regards job prospects at the end:
For Years 2 + 3 of the doctorate, there is a requirement for TEPs [Trainee EPs] to gain a salaried position as a Trainee in a local authority Educational Psychology Service. These are generally advertised as 2-year posts to cover you for Years 2 + 3, with many EPSs trying to offer a continuation of the post as a main-grade EP once you've qualified at the end - i.e. you'd stay in the same service with the associated pay-rise to a qualified salary (currently around £32-35k I believe). This transition within the same service isn't always guaranteed though, due to uncertainty over budgets etc, so you may have to apply for a post elsewhere. There's a steady stream of main-grade EP vacancies being advertised in the profession's newsletter, and at the minute most are saying they're happy to receive applications from "Year 3 Trainee EPs who are due to qualify in summer 2009", so that's not a discriminatory factor.
As an addendum to that, the whole 'applying for Year 2 + 3 posts' is just as stressful as applying to get on the actual course! I'm embroiled in it at the moment, having had 2 interviews last week and being beaten to the post by trainees from another course in the region both times :x This time applying, interview & presentation prep etc is coming on top of assignment writing, writing up placement tasks and of course the extra reading around modules - you definitely need good time management skills!!

Lots of information about funding and the whole process can be found on the Children's Workforce Development Council website - the CWDC are the body administering the application scheme and training process.

There are references on this forum to an EdPsy forum - unfortunately that disappeared as the administrator changed career and gave up the registration. This was replaced by another forum which was slowly gathering pace, but I noticed that that, too, disappeared last week as the domain registration expired :evil: :roll:

If there are any more Qs about EdPsy I'm happy to answer, please can you post them on this thread though rather than sending PMs so that anyone else interested can benefit too :)

HTH
"Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." - Red Auerbach

tasha_b26
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Nov 13, 2008 2:02 pm

Post by tasha_b26 » Mon Feb 23, 2009 5:22 pm

wow- thanks very much for the info, its given me something to think about!

User avatar
choirgirl
Posts: 1440
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 9:41 am
Location: Midlands

Post by choirgirl » Mon Feb 23, 2009 11:51 pm

No problem :) - just to add (again), the latest version of the EdPsy forum is now back up and running again and can be found at http://edpsy.forumdes.com/. Most of the active posters ATM are those currently applying to get on the course.
"Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." - Red Auerbach

lindabrown
Posts: 50
Joined: Sun Aug 08, 2010 6:43 pm

Post by lindabrown » Mon Aug 09, 2010 6:50 pm

choirgirl wrote:No problem :) - just to add (again), the latest version of the EdPsy forum is now back up and running again and can be found at http://edpsy.forumdes.com/. Most of the active posters ATM are those currently applying to get on the course.
Hi choirgirl and All,
Thanks for your kindly reply. I was wondering about the prospects of finding a job after a doctorate in ED Psy, as I'm very much interested in reading this course.
What happens in years 2 and 3 if a student doesn't get a place as an Assistant Ed Psy? :)

User avatar
choirgirl
Posts: 1440
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 9:41 am
Location: Midlands

Post by choirgirl » Tue Aug 10, 2010 10:18 pm

Hi,

As far as finding a job after completion of the doctorate goes - with the current government's enthusiasm for cutting spending in public sector working, including clawing back as much education funding as they can :evil: , your guess is as good as mine at the minute :roll:

I exaggerate slightly because it's something I'm feeling particularly anxious about right now. Everyone I work with (i.e. qualified EPs!) keeps reassuring me that there WILL be jobs available for qualified EPs just the same as always, as there will always be children and schools who need our services, especially for statutory work. However, I'm still left wondering as to who/how these EPs will be paid for if there's less money in the local authority 'pot' to start with! Apparently there's always locum work... and the job situation might mean that qualified EPs may have to be flexible with moving around the country for work, and/or consider working less than 1.0wte.

A circular was issued last week, drafted jointly by the AEP, NAPEP and English doctorate course directors voicing their concerns about the current problem of some Year 1 TEPs being unable to find salaried or bursary positions as trainee EPs in LA services for Years 2+3 (2010-12). Latest figures were that around 20% of Year 1 trainees were still without a post for the start of Year 2 on September 1st 2010, with all EPSs being urged to either find a salary or accept trainees on a bursary system. In my personal experience I don't know what happens - or what might happen - if a Year 1 trainee doesn't secure a post for Years 2+3, as the situation hasn't occurred before (to my knowledge), so I'm loath to answer that part of your question.

In terms of actually getting onto training in the future, AFAIK the CWDC is still planning to open up application season this autumn as it has done for the past 3 years... however, with the funding issue still very far from resolved it's uncertain as to how secure the route to, and through, training from next year actually is. Again, that's just my personal perception though. No doubt things are being discussed and worked through and moved along towards some semblance of stability by the AEP/NAPEP/course director working group to the best of their combined abilities. At the end of the day, there are about 150 new EPs qualifying each year at the minute, and the profession's already understaffed; if there's no training then the flow will dry up and the workforce will shrink even further, which is in no-one's interests, least of all those of children and young people!

Hang in there is about the best I can say to anyone currently undertaking, or aspiring to undertake, training :roll: :)

Edit: just read that back, what a negative note to end on! I feel I should add that I absolutely LOVE my training, except for when it feels like my brain is dying occasionally :wink: - it's the hardest thing I've ever done but also one of the most fulfilling :D
"Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." - Red Auerbach

lindabrown
Posts: 50
Joined: Sun Aug 08, 2010 6:43 pm

Post by lindabrown » Wed Aug 11, 2010 10:10 am

ChoirG, thanks for your reply, frankness and encouragement; only that I'm not AFAIK, I'm Lindabrown. I pray that you succeed in your program and find adequate job. Cheers! :)

User avatar
BlueCat
Site Admin
Posts: 2844
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 2:42 pm

Post by BlueCat » Wed Aug 11, 2010 11:07 am

lindabrown wrote:ChoirG, thanks for your reply, frankness and encouragement; only that I'm not AFAIK, I'm Lindabrown. I pray that you succeed in your program and find adequate job. Cheers! :)
As Far As I Know (AFAIK) webspeak
There's no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong clothes. Billy Connolly.

lindabrown
Posts: 50
Joined: Sun Aug 08, 2010 6:43 pm

Post by lindabrown » Wed Aug 11, 2010 4:05 pm

BlueCat wrote:
lindabrown wrote:ChoirG, thanks for your reply, frankness and encouragement; only that I'm not AFAIK, I'm Lindabrown. I pray that you succeed in your program and find adequate job. Cheers! :)
As Far As I Know (AFAIK) webspeak
'sorry for my ignorance.

User avatar
choirgirl
Posts: 1440
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 9:41 am
Location: Midlands

Post by choirgirl » Thu Aug 12, 2010 6:13 pm

Sorry! :oops: Other acronyms, AEP = Association of Educational Psychologists, NAPEP = National Association of Principal Educational Psychologists, CWDC = Children's Workforce Development Council. Apologies for not being clearer, it gets a bit automatic after a while :)
"Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." - Red Auerbach

lindabrown
Posts: 50
Joined: Sun Aug 08, 2010 6:43 pm

Post by lindabrown » Thu Aug 12, 2010 7:14 pm

choirgirl wrote:Sorry! :oops: Other acronyms, AEP = Association of Educational Psychologists, NAPEP = National Association of Principal Educational Psychologists, CWDC = Children's Workforce Development Council. Apologies for not being clearer, it gets a bit automatic after a while :)
No prbs :D

lindabrown
Posts: 50
Joined: Sun Aug 08, 2010 6:43 pm

Post by lindabrown » Sat Aug 14, 2010 4:28 pm

I've just learnt that for Educ Psy you're not allowed to apply until you have got your degree/certificate in Psychology + GBC. This means that candidates who'll graduate from their Psychology course in 2011 will have to wait a whole year before they apply :(

User avatar
choirgirl
Posts: 1440
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 9:41 am
Location: Midlands

Post by choirgirl » Sun Aug 15, 2010 7:05 pm

Well, for most people - unless maybe you're doing your degree as a mature student, or you've gained lots of relevant experience whilst studying - that should give time to gain the experience which is required to apply for and gain a place on training. It gives you time to be able to get a suitable job (or jobs), and be able to apply the psychology which you've studied in real-world, practical ways in order for you to be able to reflect on it well at the application and interview stages :)
"Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." - Red Auerbach

lindabrown
Posts: 50
Joined: Sun Aug 08, 2010 6:43 pm

Post by lindabrown » Sun Aug 15, 2010 9:36 pm

choirgirl wrote:Well, for most people - unless maybe you're doing your degree as a mature student, or you've gained lots of relevant experience whilst studying - that should give time to gain the experience which is required to apply for and gain a place on training. It gives you time to be able to get a suitable job (or jobs), and be able to apply the psychology which you've studied in real-world, practical ways in order for you to be able to reflect on it well at the application and interview stages :)
Choirg, in that case, I think I'm going to apply because I think I've got the experience, and I'm a mature student.

User avatar
choirgirl
Posts: 1440
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 9:41 am
Location: Midlands

Post by choirgirl » Sun Aug 15, 2010 10:06 pm

Cool! Best of luck with your application :)
"Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." - Red Auerbach

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest