Educational Psychology

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Teir
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Joined: Wed Feb 29, 2012 9:24 am
Location: London

Re: Educational Psychology

Post by Teir » Tue Jul 29, 2014 3:54 pm

Hi JamesFManc, jansher_b,

I have not personally heard of any newly qualified EPs who have not succeeded in securing a job over the past several years. As far as I know, the 150 or so EPs qualifying each year are not satisfying the demand from services, so I wouldn't be too worried. The only potential issue is that you may not be able to immediately find a post in your preferred location.

Jobs are typically advertised by the AEP, but frequently appear elsewhere too. EPs are paid in line with the Soulbury Payscale, which you can find here:

http://www.nasuwt.org.uk/consum/groups/ ... 011873.pdf

As a newly qualified EP, you are likely to start on at least Point 2 on this scale, which is £36,013. I would stress that, if money is a big motivator for you (no judgement!), this is not the career-path for you, and you need to be really clear about that before you make a five year commitment.

Re: emigrating, I know that New Zealand are actively recruiting EPs from the UK. Search EPNET for Catherine Williams / Kate Williams for more info. Anecdotally, EPs who move to New Zealand do so for the higher quality of life, rather than the money, as wages are apparently not very high there.


Teir

jansher_b
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Joined: Sun Nov 18, 2007 4:32 pm

Re: Educational Psychology

Post by jansher_b » Tue Jul 29, 2014 4:00 pm

Thank you very much for all that info Teir.
I know working within public services is never going to pay well and trust me when I say that is not what motivates me! It's just helpful to have an idea if I'll be financially comfortable.

Thanks for the info re: New Zealand and the contacts. Your help is very much appreciated :)

Teir
Posts: 17
Joined: Wed Feb 29, 2012 9:24 am
Location: London

Re: Educational Psychology

Post by Teir » Tue Jul 29, 2014 4:11 pm

You're welcome, good luck!

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choirgirl
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Re: Educational Psychology

Post by choirgirl » Tue Jul 29, 2014 5:40 pm

Hi there,

Apologies for not having been around on this board for such a long time - workload has been absolutely crazy for much of this (academic) year, and by the time I get to the end of the day switching on my laptop and staying in 'work mode' has been a distant second choice to 'falling asleep on the sofa'!! :wink:

Firstly, to charlie007 - congratulations on getting a place on training for September, that's a great achievement :D Now after all the energy and worry you've expended on GETTING on the course, it's time to start contemplating what it will actually be like BEING on the course.... I speak from experience! :roll: :)

To the people asking about current job prospects - I must strongly reiterate Teir's response prior to mine. There are currently what feels like *masses* of jobs being advertised for qualified EPs (including EPs about to qualify this summer), certainly in comparison with this time 2-3 years ago (when I was about to qualify). However, jobs are almost exclusively advertised on the AEP website (in addition to councils' own websites) - in a protected section which you can't see unless you're an AEP member and are able to log in (and you have to be a qualified EP or a TEP to be able to join the AEP). As of this moment, I can see the following LAs are advertising: Ceredigion, Kent, Lincolnshire, Wokingham, Suffolk, Windsor & Maidenhead, North Lincolnshire and Bromley. Those adverts include f/t, p/t, permanent and temporary work, at varying levels of seniority. You can go on each of those councils' websites and look at the details, for some examples. A few weeks ago, there were about 3 times that number of authorities - and private/independent companies - advertising on the AEP; it can be a bit time-dependent when adverts come out, thinking of time-scales for interviews and likely start dates after notice periods etc etc. As Teir has also said, EPs have established salaries on the Soulbury Pay Scales, which were last revised in September 2009. I actually think that the pay is very good; at least, I would never have dreamed a few years ago that I would be able to earn this amount of money, but maybe that's more reflective of me and my background! :)

For Sylviee who was asking about attachment theory - this is seen a hugely important in my service, both in terms of EPs being knowledgeable and conversant in it and its implications for children's emotional health and wellbeing and readiness to learn, and in terms of us being able to share this with other professionals such as teaching staff, and other clients. As just two examples, I have recently delivered a keynote speech at a local autism conference based on Heather Moran's "Autism or Attachment?" work, and some EP colleagues are in the middle of delivering attachment awareness training for foster carers. With regards to the research underpinning it, as with most theories it's an ongoing and evolving field, but the Bowlby theoretical work and more recent work by Kim Golding and Louise Bomber get cited a lot.

Hope that helps somewhat. I've put it together quite quickly, so apologies for any errors/omissions. Have a good summer, everyone :sunny:
"Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." - Red Auerbach

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RossPsych
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Post by RossPsych » Mon Aug 04, 2014 4:31 pm

Apologies if this has been asked before (search function doesn't work on my phone) but has the bps/decp etc...ever considered releasing an alternative handbook for educational psychology?

http://shop.bps.org.uk/the-alternative- ... entry.html

Didn't know whether its something that has been discussed on a tep/ep level and so not aware of it.

Just prompted by now feeling "ready" to apply this year, and looking through course options - thought I'd ask here first before going to decp themselves.

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choirgirl
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Re: Educational Psychology

Post by choirgirl » Wed Aug 06, 2014 5:05 pm

It's not something which has ever been suggested to my knowledge.....
"Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." - Red Auerbach

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choirgirl
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Location: Midlands

Re: Educational Psychology

Post by choirgirl » Fri Aug 08, 2014 11:07 am

This was posted on the EPNET email forum this morning:

-------------------------------------

We are currently advertising for 2 assistant educational psychologists in Wokingham. Please see the WBC website.

Elaine Munro
Principal Educational Psychologist
Brambles Area Team
Children's and Young People's Services
Wokingham Borough Council
Telephone: 0118 908 8011
elaine.munro@wokingham.gov.uk

http://www.wokingham.gov.uk

-------------------------------------
"Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." - Red Auerbach

Zanzibel
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Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2012 9:35 am

Re: Educational Psychology

Post by Zanzibel » Sun Aug 10, 2014 12:08 pm

Thanks for posting that, choirgirl.

And hello everyone :)

I'm currently considering educational psychology as a career. I'm working as a PWP within IAPT at the moment, and although I enjoy it I think my heart is set on working with young people. I worked in schools abroad for a few years as a TEFL teacher in France and as a LSA/assistant psych in a school in India, working with children with learning difficulties. I also used to work as a volunteer play therapist on a home-based programme for a child with autism for a couple of years quite a few years ago.

Although I think that I have experience I can draw from, and although I think my experience with CBT will be useful, too, i'm aware that I don't have any recent experience of working with children in the UK.

I'm not sure I have enough experience to apply this year but might do so for the experience, if anything. In the meantime, i'm looking to gain some experience this year.... Assistant ed psych jobs look interesting, but i'm aware there aren't many out there. I'm going down to part-time with my PWP work soon to give me a couple of days a week where I can hopefully get some experience in schools. Has anyone got any advice in terms of what experience might be good at this point? I assume the best would be to find something where I can work alongside an EP...
Do many TA/LSA roles offer this? I've been reading some TA job descriptions but don't often see the mention of working alongside EPs, just SENCOs. Most posts seem to be full-time and this might be best for the experience, so I am considering this.

Sorry this was quite long! It's nice to find a place where I can process my current thoughts a little and find out about others' experiences :) Thanks so much for the insight so far - I've found reading this thread very helpful.

HaleMan
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Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 3:00 pm

Re: Educational Psychology

Post by HaleMan » Sun Aug 10, 2014 1:22 pm

Without looking at the standard TA/LSA posts, where in my experience you have to fight to spend time with the school's EP at all, have you considered looking at Emotional Literacy Support Assistant posts (which usually receive direct supervision from an EP) or Learning Mentor posts (where EP contact is highly likely, along with great opportunities to apply psychology to working with children/young people)?

Zanzibel
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2012 9:35 am

Re: Educational Psychology

Post by Zanzibel » Mon Aug 11, 2014 1:58 pm

Thanks very much, HaleMan.

I just looked into ELSA posts, and it seems you need a training that is generally accessible if you are already a TA. However it does look like a very interesting role. I'll also check out some Learning Mentor posts. Thanks for the tips!

Daniel
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Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2011 4:07 pm

Re: Educational Psychology

Post by Daniel » Wed Aug 13, 2014 9:59 am

Quick question; what will the new code of practice mean to educational psychologists in terms of their day to day duties?

Imipod
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Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2014 9:10 pm

Educational psychology

Post by Imipod » Sun Sep 07, 2014 5:18 pm

Hi!

I'm hoping to apply this year for the training. I'm just finishing my MSc Psychology (BPS accredited) conversion now and will have graduated before the application deadline. I have the following experience:

- lots of paid experience in different kinds of schools (secondary, special needs, post 16, summer schools) as teaching assistant/TEFL teacher during my time as an undergrad and just after graduation

- two years on the Teach First programme as a secondary school teacher, where I completed my PGCE at the IOE and was form tutor for a Year 7 SEN class in my NQT year

- paid support work with teenagers and young adults with learning disabilities and autism at a local charity

- working in children's clubs and youth groups at the same charity, some for children with Asperger's and one for children with severe and complex disabilities/health needs

- I'm also going to do some temporary work as a Parent Partnership Officer, helping parents understand special needs provision in my local area and shedding some light on recent reforms including new Educational, Health and Care Plans.

- I also have a lot of experience is with young disabled adults (18-25). Does this "count" now that Children's Services are going to assist in supporting young people to age 25?

I've been working part time the last year since I've been doing my MSc. I don't know what the best thing is to do now in terms of my application. I don't feel like it would be right to apply for a permanent teaching position (it's a bit late now anyway) since I know I am going to leave as soon as I get onto the training. The charity I am at now knows that I want to be an ed psych and won't promote me or let me continue as PPO since they know I want to leave within the next few years. It's a charity for adults and children and around half of my work will be with adults if I continue there.

Anyone have any ideas on what I should do to make my chances of getting on the training as high as possible? Supply teaching? Work as a TA? Continue at the charity where I am currently? Apply to a different charity that I haven't told I am going to leave when I get on the training?! Research? I don't even know if I will get on the training this year (or ever!), so it does seem a bit silly to get a job below my level of qualification and experience just because I am applying. Obviously an assistant ed psych role or an assistant psych role in CAMHS would be amazing but there don't seem to be any advertised right now.

Would an honorary assistant clinical psych position working with adults look bad? E.g. as if I'm trying to hedge my bets and apply for both?

Anyone currently on the training or already an ed psych who can give me advice?

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choirgirl
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Location: Midlands

Re: Educational Psychology

Post by choirgirl » Fri Sep 12, 2014 5:22 pm

Hi Imipod,

Having read your post, this is what I think:

- You have lots of really valuable and useful experiences related to working with children/young people, which will look good in the 'list of jobs' section of the application form. For each (or most) of these, can you now write a sentence or two for yourself, explaining what psychology you used/drew on in this role, and what you learned about working with this client group? That will help you in the 'personal statement' section of your application, where they won't want to see a roll-call of "I did this job, then this, then this [box tick, tick, tick]", but actually what you got out of it that makes you suitable for EP training, what was important to you about it, and makes you want to be an EP.

- You mention possibly doing research to boost your application further. Your MSc must have included a research/dissertation element, so hopefully you will have got a good mark in this area which you can use to demonstrate your research skills on a training application. If this wasn't a strong area for you, then maybe you might think about something additional you could do to show your research skills, such as an evaluation or audit in your current role.

- Do you have any scope in your current role as a PPO to come into contact with other professionals, perhaps through multi-agency meetings or Team Around the Child meetings (or whatever they're called now in your LA!), such as Education Officers or social workers? This would be a good chance to illustrate your understanding of where the EP's role might sit in relation to other professional services who also have a remit to support children/young people's learning and wellbeing.

- Yes, your experience with 18-25s does very much count, in fact this is something which all EPs need to upskill on (if they don't already have skills in this area) since the new Code of Practice has been published. Having some skills and experience in this area already is something which you could highlight in terms of what it has shown you in an EP context, or what you have learned you will 'need to know' (what's different about working as a psychologist with/for this age group versus primary/secondary school pupils?).

Hope that helps, to be going on with :) Oh, and 3 Assistant Psychologist posts have just been advertised today in West Sussex Council (see their website).
"Music washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life." - Red Auerbach

aspiringpsych
Posts: 120
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2013 1:45 pm

Re: Educational Psychology

Post by aspiringpsych » Wed Sep 24, 2014 1:54 pm

Hi this may be a silly question but would anyone be able to give me some advice on how interviews for assistant psychologist posts in education settings or with education boards differ to those in the Trusts/health and social care? I understand the role and sector is different and also that each job itself is individual but what are the types of topics asked in comparison? I have only ever been to AP posts in health trusts so I have talked about things on clinical governance and audit and child protection/risk procedures, record keeping as well as assessment and psychological model/hypothetical situation type questions etc etc. If anyone has been to both types of interviews and could comment on how they differ or have any advice to give I would appreciate it. I don't have any interviews coming up but I am just curious and wonder how the interview itself would differ.

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RossPsych
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Re: Re: Educational Psychology

Post by RossPsych » Thu Sep 25, 2014 12:31 pm

aspiringpsych wrote:Hi this may be a silly question but would anyone be able to give me some advice on how interviews for assistant psychologist posts in education settings or with education boards differ to those in the Trusts/health and social care? I understand the role and sector is different and also that each job itself is individual but what are the types of topics asked in comparison? I have only ever been to AP posts in health trusts so I have talked about things on clinical governance and audit and child protection/risk procedures, record keeping as well as assessment and psychological model/hypothetical situation type questions etc etc. If anyone has been to both types of interviews and could comment on how they differ or have any advice to give I would appreciate it. I don't have any interviews coming up but I am just curious and wonder how the interview itself would differ.
Hi aspiringpsych

I have only ever had an undergrad "assistant EP" position and never been for an NHS based trust position, so not best placed to comment but didnt want your query to go unanswered.

If it helps in my interview things were centered around my experience around YP, what I understood about the EP role (which I think is a question most EPs continue to ask themselves!), and how I saw the assistant role/wanted to develop. Scenarios tended to be around safeguarding and also awareness of how key building relationships are with schools.

To my mind since the doctoral training, assistant EP posts (although note the ones above a few replies earlier) are like gold dust as trainees become the priority (and can offer more). I sometimes felt the LA I worked in wasn't quite clear on how it wanted to use assistants (at times feeling like I was more specialist teaching support than "assistant EP"), although you can flip this to a positive and mould the role to what you want it to be!

Sometimes when I've looked at person specs for other LAs the assistant positions seem fairly close to a trainee position - so the lack of consistency in how the role is seen might not make an answer to your question easy!

Anyway - just my two pennies worth. With Ed Psych I think its important to try and get EPS experience, but there's so many avenues to explore to build up a good and varied portfolio of experience, that assistant posts arent the be all and end all. I'm currently comjng from jobs with a social work focus but I aim to keep my foot in the school door by being a governor too.

Hope that helps in some way!

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