Anxiety in interviews

Discuss what to expect in job and course interviews, what topics might be covered, how to manage anxiety, and how to get the desired result!
Ruth2417
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Anxiety in interviews

Post by Ruth2417 » Fri Mar 08, 2019 8:49 pm

Hello,

So I’m in a bit of a rut...
I seem to manage to get assistant psychologist interviews and my written applications are viewed highly, however I suck at interviews.
My feedback is just that I need to say more and expand. What I do say seems to be fine. Anyone got any advice or know of any training I could do.
I get super anxious in interviews even if I know how to answer!

At the moment I’m not sure if it’s worth going through the stress of interviews before I can overcome the fear of interviews.
I do suffer from anxiety generally and I don’t want that preventing me from moving forward so am trying to push myself, however I’m not entirely sure how to move forward.

It’s frustrating, as that’s what’s stopping me from progressing, please if anyone has any advice or similar experience and have managed to get past it please let me know ! 😂

Should I persevere or take a break ! 😂

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hawke
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Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by hawke » Fri Mar 08, 2019 9:14 pm

I've posted about this a couple of times - have a look back through my posts and have a read of the relevant threads.

If you avoid interviews though, the fear will get worse not better! I only improved after I stopped avoiding them - particularly the more subtle avoidance behaviours that sabotaged my performance.

Ruth2417
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Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by Ruth2417 » Fri Mar 08, 2019 10:34 pm

Thankyou, yes so far I have attended them and I know that avoiding won’t help! It’s progress, and I recognise that 😂

I’ll have a look

Lancelot
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Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by Lancelot » Sat Mar 09, 2019 4:10 pm

Why do you not seek some sessions of cognitive behavioural therapy? After all, you are seeking to train as a psychologist and there are theories and treatment to address this problem. There are many things you could do but best under therapist:

Evaluating negative thoughts
Testing out specific negative predictions as well as behaviours that you think it keeping you safe from worst outcome
Practice different attentional external focus
Repeated exposure to fear
Positive imagery
Roleplaying interviews with feedback in mind
Survey others people experience of interviews
Flashcards on the normality of failure

Ruth2417
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Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by Ruth2417 » Sun Mar 10, 2019 11:59 pm

Hello,

Yes I am aware of that and have been through CBT when I was a lot younger and it really didnt work for me- partly due to the nature of the therapy session.

I am planning to do some of these things myself, having the previous experience and knowledge of CBT it hopefully will help. And I am going to try doing exposure work with a friend!

I think it’s mainly just feeling comfortable expanding on my answers and allowing myself to do so. So surely with practice It’ll be fine!

Many thanks

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maven
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Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by maven » Mon Mar 11, 2019 3:08 am

Ruth2417 wrote:
Sun Mar 10, 2019 11:59 pm
Hello,

Yes I am aware of that and have been through CBT when I was a lot younger and it really didnt work for me- partly due to the nature of the therapy session.

I am planning to do some of these things myself, having the previous experience and knowledge of CBT it hopefully will help. And I am going to try doing exposure work with a friend!

I think it’s mainly just feeling comfortable expanding on my answers and allowing myself to do so. So surely with practice It’ll be fine!

Many thanks
I always find it strange when people who want to train to deliver therapy find excuses not to use therapy themselves. It sounds like because one therapist or model of therapy didn't quite work for you, you now want to self-help, or use a friend informally, rather than just seeking out another therapist who might be a better match. I really think that is worth reflecting on, because it speaks to all the stigma and doubt that other people have, and will have about coming to see you one day if you qualify in this profession.
Maven.

Wise men talk because they have something to say, fools because they have to say something - Plato
The fool thinks himself to be wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool - Shakespeare

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mungle
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Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by mungle » Mon Mar 11, 2019 1:22 pm

Hi Ruth2417,

Sorry to hear that you're struggling with anxiety in interviews. On the self-help front you could use CBT books (e.g. the overcoming series) and these may be enough or you may find you need more. It might help if you can distinguish the thoughts and beliefs behind these anxieties e.g. is it about not being good enough/being judged and found wanting etc. Other self-help approaches could involve guided meditations, breathing exercises and progressive muscle relaxation. You could follow a mindfulness app/book or programme.

IMHO, having therapy (especially when there is something you know you need to work on) is invaluble both as a person a a future therapist/CP. If you go privately, it can seem like a huge expense and investing £1k (maybe more but spread out) is a big commitment. Howvever, it sounds like it is holding you back professionally and you may know of personal effects. Perhaps it is time to self-refer through IAPT or to contact a private therapist/CP.

As a broader point, I do think to be a congruent and effective therapist you need to beleive that therapy can work. Is it just one therapy or therapist that didn't work for you or is it broader? CPs could tailor a number of approaches to you and work on any blocks. Shop around for someone you can build a rapport with, use your experience and knowledge to choose someone who's profile suggest they will fit with you and go and see.


All the best Ruth...

Ruth2417
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Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by Ruth2417 » Mon Mar 11, 2019 3:04 pm

maven wrote:
Mon Mar 11, 2019 3:08 am
Ruth2417 wrote:
Sun Mar 10, 2019 11:59 pm
Hello,

Yes I am aware of that and have been through CBT when I was a lot younger and it really didnt work for me- partly due to the nature of the therapy session.

I am planning to do some of these things myself, having the previous experience and knowledge of CBT it hopefully will help. And I am going to try doing exposure work with a friend!

I think it’s mainly just feeling comfortable expanding on my answers and allowing myself to do so. So surely with practice It’ll be fine!

Many thanks
I always find it strange when people who want to train to deliver therapy find excuses not to use therapy themselves. It sounds like because one therapist or model of therapy didn't quite work for you, you now want to self-help, or use a friend informally, rather than just seeking out another therapist who might be a better match. I really think that is worth reflecting on, because it speaks to all the stigma and doubt that other people have, and will have about coming to see you one day if you qualify in this profession.

Hello, sorry didn’t really explain that well!

I am continuing to work with an OT doing CBT/exposure related work (I had been doing CBT not to long ago) as I didn’t feel that the CBT sessions/relationship worked. Where I live there is over a year waiting list for CBT, unless you go private, which I cannot afford! They don’t seem to offer any other models very regularly where I am unfortunately.

It’s not that I don’t think it could work, or something else may be better, it’s more that there isn’t anything available that I can afford at the moment.

I totally understand where you are coming from though and it has definately made me think.

Ruth2417
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Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2018 11:58 pm

Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by Ruth2417 » Mon Mar 11, 2019 3:17 pm

mungle wrote:
Mon Mar 11, 2019 1:22 pm
Hi Ruth2417,

Sorry to hear that you're struggling with anxiety in interviews. On the self-help front you could use CBT books (e.g. the overcoming series) and these may be enough or you may find you need more. It might help if you can distinguish the thoughts and beliefs behind these anxieties e.g. is it about not being good enough/being judged and found wanting etc. Other self-help approaches could involve guided meditations, breathing exercises and progressive muscle relaxation. You could follow a mindfulness app/book or programme.

IMHO, having therapy (especially when there is something you know you need to work on) is invaluble both as a person a a future therapist/CP. If you go privately, it can seem like a huge expense and investing £1k (maybe more but spread out) is a big commitment. Howvever, it sounds like it is holding you back professionally and you may know of personal effects. Perhaps it is time to self-refer through IAPT or to contact a private therapist/CP.

As a broader point, I do think to be a congruent and effective therapist you need to beleive that therapy can work. Is it just one therapy or therapist that didn't work for you or is it broader? CPs could tailor a number of approaches to you and work on any blocks. Shop around for someone you can build a rapport with, use your experience and knowledge to choose someone who's profile suggest they will fit with you and go and see.


All the best Ruth...
Hi,

Thanks for that,

At the moment I can’t afford that but may look into it at some point!

It’s not CBT that I don’t think works, I know it works for some people and could work for me it’s just finding a therapist that you feel comfortable with and I am limited money-wise. Personally, I am unsure whether it is just because of the anxiety that I find it hard to engage in the sessions which prevents progress because it feels unnatural- again that could possibly be the relationship.

CBT is effective, it’s more that I haven’t found it effective for me with various people- but that’s more because I found it hard to talk/engage with people. So maybe a different therapy would work- just I don’t have access to it unless I earn more 😂.

From the sessions I have done, I have gained a knowledge and understanding of what I can do myself and feel that might work better for me than seeing someone, but that’s just for me personally, not as a general statement of CBT effectiveness.

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mungle
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Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by mungle » Mon Mar 11, 2019 8:51 pm

I find it helpful to think of Maslow's hierarchy of needs when thinking of paying for therapy - food and shelter expenses need to come first but personally I found it worthwhile to forgo having a holiday for a few years to pay for therapy. But it's a personal decision. I'd rather live in a world with properly funded NHS services.

Some IAPT services may offer mindfulness or EMDR. You can often self-refer to groups in IAPT.

In the meantime, you could try looking at ACT and Compassionate self-help books and mindfulness resources

Ruth2417
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Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by Ruth2417 » Tue Mar 12, 2019 12:38 am

Thanks, I will have a look and see what is around my area. On reflection CBT over the years has help a great deal, but I know I need to continue working on it afterward. It’s is important that I try an address this now so that I can actually get into this field of work! Interviews are slowly getting better though so that’s positive 😂

I’m not in England so IAPT services aren’t about!

Many thanks

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maven
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Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by maven » Wed Mar 13, 2019 12:32 pm

Given you were prepared to consider doing a master's degree on the other thread, which presumably costs thousands of pounds, I wonder why you are unwilling to spend some of that same money on therapy if that is the barrier to professional development?
Maven.

Wise men talk because they have something to say, fools because they have to say something - Plato
The fool thinks himself to be wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool - Shakespeare

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ell
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Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by ell » Wed Mar 13, 2019 6:52 pm

Given that one of the aims of CBT is to equip people with skills that they can use when difficulties crop up, and you are saying you are currently putting into place some of those strategies, I think it sounds like the CBT was more effective than you perhaps thought it was at the time. Therapy might be helpful for you, but given money is a thing, then seeing how you get on with the behavioural approach you are using might be a good start.

Ruth2417
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Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by Ruth2417 » Thu Mar 14, 2019 10:06 am

maven wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 12:32 pm
Given you were prepared to consider doing a master's degree on the other thread, which presumably costs thousands of pounds, I wonder why you are unwilling to spend some of that same money on therapy if that is the barrier to professional development?

I would have to take out two student loans to do the masters, I’m not sure how it’s works yet but would have to scope it out. But I can’t pay upfront.

I would be willing to pay, I just need to find a contracted job first. I’ve not really looked into it but will see what’s available in my area.

Ruth2417
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Re: Anxiety in interviews

Post by Ruth2417 » Thu Mar 14, 2019 10:12 am

ell wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 6:52 pm
Given that one of the aims of CBT is to equip people with skills that they can use when difficulties crop up, and you are saying you are currently putting into place some of those strategies, I think it sounds like the CBT was more effective than you perhaps thought it was at the time. Therapy might be helpful for you, but given money is a thing, then seeing how you get on with the behavioural approach you are using might be a good start.
Yes I do think it has helped over the years, but I guess it’s just beeen very slowly making progress! I would consider paying, I just need to work out how much it costs and if I can afford it on top of bills at the moment. Thanks I will do that in the meantime. :)

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