Help - > interview for Assistant maternity & neonatol

Discuss what to expect in job and course interviews, what topics might be covered, how to manage anxiety, and how to get the desired result!
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sisterbliss
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Help - > interview for Assistant maternity & neonatol

Post by sisterbliss » Wed Nov 11, 2009 1:20 am

I could really do with some help. I managed to get an interview for an Assistant Psychologist post.

The post involves the professional psychological care of children and families within a clinical psychology maternity & neonatology service.

I have experience with children and working with families, as a support worker/project worker. And some ABA/VB therapy. I have also applied my counselling skills qualification to counsel children.

But have zero clinical practice or knowledge of what sort of work you would do in this environment. I guess it would be looking at post-partum depression and paediatrics, such as children not adhering to treatment. phobias etc....

I would be grateful for any advice or experience in this setting. What the day-to-day activities would be etc...

Info about what sort of models, therapies or theories that would be used would be also greatly appreciated.

Also any advice specific to these client groups would really help me.

Thank you in advance.
J

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BlueCat
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Post by BlueCat » Wed Nov 11, 2009 11:44 am

As well as thinking about possible post-natal depression, you will likely need to think about models of grief - either for a child who actually does not survive, or a child who is seriously ill/has a congenital abnormality (parents will be grieving for the loss of the child they expected, i.e. a well child). Stress management for parents living with uncertainty of a child's survival/prognosis. There is likely to be lots of acute distress to manage. Staff support and counselling - both when a child is seriously unwell and when a chid unexpectedly dies. Models of early attachment. Likely to be quite a bit of liaison with other services (e.g. health visitors, child protection) so have a think about the multi-agency stuff you've done to date. Possibility of screening for anticipated difficulties post-partum. Possibly thinking about process - giving bad news, normal emotional reactions to this type of news (grief models again maybe?). 'it is also possible that you will be engaged in research data collection type activities.

Perhaps give the service a call to find out a little bit about the service, as this will help you understand a little more about what you could be seeing, and help you to prepare.

blan09
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Post by blan09 » Wed Nov 11, 2009 1:23 pm

I am currently reading Clinical Psychology in Practice, by Helen Beinart and there is very informative chapter 24 on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder following Childbirth and Pregnancy Loss. The chapther is followed by detailed reference list, so that could be helpful for you.

NICE guidelines could be helpful as well for you - specially the
http://guidance.nice.org.uk/CG45
and http://guidance.nice.org.uk/CG37

National Childbirth Trust website could be helpful as well
http://www.nctpregnancyandbabycare.com/home
Last edited by blan09 on Sat Mar 06, 2010 6:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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miriam
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Post by miriam » Wed Nov 11, 2009 1:26 pm

I suspect that the kids won't be old enough for there to be issues like treatment adherence, phobias, etc. There will probably be lots round attachment, parental mental health and its impact on babies, and as Bluecat says the impact of bereavements and children being born with physical or developmental disability or a serious health condition on both parents and siblings.
Miriam

See my blog at http://clinpsyeye.wordpress.com

sisterbliss
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Post by sisterbliss » Wed Nov 11, 2009 5:57 pm

miriam wrote:I suspect that the kids won't be old enough for there to be issues like treatment adherence, phobias, etc. There will probably be lots round attachment, parental mental health and its impact on babies, and as Bluecat says the impact of bereavements and children being born with physical or developmental disability or a serious health condition on both parents and siblings.
Thank you all.

I was thinking that the children would likely be too young, and it would be a predominate focus on the parents.

It sounds like I have quite a lot of nessesay experience, without realising it. I completed a counselling qualification and have been a bearevment counsellor for Cruse for over a year now. And often I counsel parents who have lost children. I also counsel for a motor neuron charity and routinely counsel/prepare parents/spouse for the death of love ones.

Hopefully I can apploy a lot ofthat knowledge.

blan09 wrote:I am currently doing MSc dissertation on antenatal care and childbirth experience, and would be happy to reccomend you journal articles I am studying for my work - there is lots of information out there.

When is actually your interview?

It is next week. I would be greatful - only if you have the time - for some references.

Fluffle
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Post by Fluffle » Wed Feb 24, 2010 12:08 pm

Sorry, am a bit late joining this thread but this job sounds like my idea of heaven!!!

Did you get it? And where was it advertised?

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