Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

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sarahxgthr
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Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by sarahxgthr »

Hi all, apologies in advance, wasn't sure which forum this was best suited to

I have a 2.2 in my undergraduate which of course means I have to be very selective about which DClinPsy's I can apply to. I do now have a MSc distinction, published paper and heaps of experience including in the NHS, so was hoping to apply for the DClinPsy and see where I get. My concern is that I am currently based in Edinburgh, Scotland and all courses which seem to accommodate 2.2's are based in England.

Like some of you I am sure I am hoping to settle down and buy a home with my partner very soon, he is settled here, my family and friends are all here. I wanted to begin my own family here soon, I am nearly 30. But the doctorate is my career dream, so it feels like either I give up everything I have been working towards career-wise, or move and give up my entire life plan & support network?

Does anyone else have similar experiences of this? Is there any way to compromise IE commuting? Not sure how financially and emotionally draining it would be to do the whole pay for property in two places and commute for the week etc etc, so wold be great to hear about anyone who has experience of a similar circumstance

Thank you!!
AGoodCupOfTea
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Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by AGoodCupOfTea »

I don't know how helpful it will be as I don't have direct experience with this per say, but I remember speaking to a course director for Dclin during undergrad regarding 2:2/2:1 grades and if a 2:2 was obtained hoe would things fair. He explained that if you complete a MSc alongside that 2:2, universities that ask for a 2:1 may be considerate of the application as it demonstrates wider learning at a postgraduate level, and the ability to study at a higher level. I wonder whether in your instance, it's worth speaking to the local directors or dclin courses nearest to you and seeing where they stand with 2:2, as there is no harm in a conversation? I know that's not massively helpful and of course what I said is just the words of one course director so potentially the minority not the majority.

Best of luck to you in the future for all your endeavours! ❤️
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miriam
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Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by miriam »

I think it would be too exhausting to commute for a three year course, and spending part of the week away would isolate you from your social support network. My husband did four months of working 3 hours away, with one day working from home per week and staying over in a B&B for 2-3 nights per week when he was trying to do the trial period of a new job before we made a commitment to relocate. It was expensive, exhausting and not something I'd want to do again. On the other hand, renting out your home whilst renting together near your course base for three years, may be challenging for your partner's job, but keeps you together and cuts the commute, whilst allowing the long-term plan to be to return to Scotland even if you can't get a training place there. So I'd talk about it as a couple, and then see whether and where you can gain a training place. My husband and I made a deal that he'd follow me until I qualified, then I'd follow him, and it worked well for us. Ironically, we now live in a place that neither of us work, that we chose because we love. Initially I did quite a lot of travel, but it worked out brilliantly during/since the pandemic as we now both work remotely.
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sarahxgthr
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Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by sarahxgthr »

AGoodCupOfTea wrote: Fri May 20, 2022 9:52 am I don't know how helpful it will be as I don't have direct experience with this per say, but I remember speaking to a course director for Dclin during undergrad regarding 2:2/2:1 grades and if a 2:2 was obtained hoe would things fair. He explained that if you complete a MSc alongside that 2:2, universities that ask for a 2:1 may be considerate of the application as it demonstrates wider learning at a postgraduate level, and the ability to study at a higher level. I wonder whether in your instance, it's worth speaking to the local directors or dclin courses nearest to you and seeing where they stand with 2:2, as there is no harm in a conversation? I know that's not massively helpful and of course what I said is just the words of one course director so potentially the minority not the majority.

Best of luck to you in the future for all your endeavours! ❤️
Thank you AGoodCupOfTea, I did as you advised and emailed my local course administrators regarding my chances as some of the entry requirements appeared a bit vague on this specific issue! One has got back to me so far saying it would be an immediate rejection without a 2.1 (Edinburgh), but hoping theres potentially a bit more leeway from Glasgow or even on the CAAP course entry requirements - fingers crossed!

Hopefully either way I eventually find something that works and without having to give up my psychology dream, but it is a difficult one! Thank you so much! ❤️
sarahxgthr
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Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by sarahxgthr »

miriam wrote: Fri May 20, 2022 7:14 pm I think it would be too exhausting to commute for a three year course, and spending part of the week away would isolate you from your social support network. My husband did four months of working 3 hours away, with one day working from home per week and staying over in a B&B for 2-3 nights per week when he was trying to do the trial period of a new job before we made a commitment to relocate. It was expensive, exhausting and not something I'd want to do again. On the other hand, renting out your home whilst renting together near your course base for three years, may be challenging for your partner's job, but keeps you together and cuts the commute, whilst allowing the long-term plan to be to return to Scotland even if you can't get a training place there. So I'd talk about it as a couple, and then see whether and where you can gain a training place. My husband and I made a deal that he'd follow me until I qualified, then I'd follow him, and it worked well for us. Ironically, we now live in a place that neither of us work, that we chose because we love. Initially I did quite a lot of travel, but it worked out brilliantly during/since the pandemic as we now both work remotely.
Hi Miriam,

Thanks for your response! Yeah that sounds like a bit of a logistical nightmare, especially long term. I think it would end up taking far too much of a toll as you say. Thats a really nice idea of renting out home at home and renting place to stay nearer the course in the short term however, I didn't think of that! It potentially will come down to a conversation with my partner and what he would be willing to do, but it would be nice to have that option that he will have to just follow until I manage to get qualified. I'll start putting in the ground work and being extra nice to him!!

Thank you! :D ❤️
Coxysmelons93
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Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by Coxysmelons93 »

I'm (sort of) in the same boat. Got a very low 2.1 in undergrad (rounded up from 59.4 to 60 due to a mitigating circumstances appeal, after I'd emailed 3 times and gone in person to put a claim in when the incident first happened in my second year but was not replied to and then told it was too late when I went in third year despite the effect of what happened being ongoing). Worth noting that the transcript is Identical they only changed the front page. At the time I was happy to have passed my degree at all to be honest let alone scrape a low 2.1 but I didn't realise the implications of it until applying this year.

I went on to get a distinction in my Master's and gain varied experience in support work, as an HCA and on my 2nd AP role with 1 publication and 1 submission for publication now but as I had to take a few years to heal from what happened in my 2nd year of undergrad, I am nearly 29 myself (got all my full time paid experience in the last 3.5 years).

I moved in with my partner in North Wales in October and love it here, I feel settled, I have friends here now and I love the outdoors. I also don't want to live apart from my partner again and whether he could move with me is uncertain, depends on whether he can get a job where I get on. My only options to stay living where I am are Liverpool, Bangor and at a big push Manchester or Staffordshire. Bangor is where I really want to go but one of my colleagues found out from one of the course directors that, although they advertise as accepting a 2.1 (regardless of low or high), they look at your transcript and if you got less than 60 in your third year (I got 59.8) they don't read your form, including the box 'any other factors relevant in your application' where I have explained the circumstances during my undergrad. I also struggle with short listing tests as I have Dyspraxia and my processing speed is only in the 9th percentile, I did ask Lancaster when I applied in 2019 for adjustments and was told I could have up to 10% extra time (always had 25-30% in exams), with 10% I was still only able to answer just over half the questions before the time ran out.

I had an interview for Leeds this year but part of me is relieved I didn't get on, as I would have had to move. It feels like you have to decide between the career you've been working towards or your personal life (on reflection the latter actually matters more to me). I will still apply next year but talk to all course centres first and also only apply to ones where placements would be commutable (wiling to travel 1 hour or slightly over) and if this means it takes me longer or I apply to less than 4, I'm OK with that. I have other goals I want to achieve in life, having a family, buying a house etc. the DClin is not the be all and end all. It took me a long time to rebuild my life and I'm not prepared to sacrifice my wellbeing or put my life on hold just to get on the DClin, plus I'm really enjoying my journey and current job.

I'd definitely recommend asking the courses before applying. I know, for example, Liverpool accepts 2.2s if you have a Master's at Merit or Distinction and a good academic reference, Lancaster aren't bothered about grade or experience, you just do the test. I'm pretty sure Newcastle and Teeside accept 2.2s if you have a postgrad too, I don't know if the placements there would be commutable to you as some course centres have placements in several counties- e.g. Manchester covers Merseyside and Cheshire, not just Greater Manchester- (I'm not sure where in Scotland you live so I could be way off, apologies if I am)?

And work as a research assistant or publications help to add academic points, some course centres also look at your A-levels (which I was really glad about). There's also the option of living where you get on during the week and then going home at weekends and of course the CAAP role, I'm considering that myself :)

Another option is doing a PHD as some course centres will only accept 2.2s if you've completed a PHD, my colleague is also doing a conversion course so it's that transcript that they will look at instead and Bangor said they will accept that but I wouldn't be sure about other course centres and of course it's a bit of an extreme way around this issue.

Wishing you all the best in your applications and buying a house :)

TLDR- Some course centres accept 2.2s provided you have a (good) Masters, doing a PHD is an option, living away during the week and going home at weekends is an option, always a good idea to ask the course centres directly and never put your personal life on hold or sacrifice your happiness to get on the DClin.
rachiepsy96
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Joined: Fri Jan 21, 2022 5:24 pm

Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by rachiepsy96 »

This time last year I moved 150 miles away from my friends and family for an AP post. I told myself that this was what I had to do for my psychology career as AP posts were so hard to come by and the posts where I lived (central Scotland) were so competitive and went to people with more experience than me. The post was fantastic and I was so supported within work. I loved the work as well so I do not regret the move in that respect. However, because of the move my 5 year relationship came to an end, my support network of friends and family were removed, and the location was rural so it was difficult to make friends. Despite the wonderful work, upon reflection it was not worth moving away for the job. I've recently applied at got on the DClin, and don't have to move for it, and feel so sure in my decision not to move again.

So, from personal experience, I would say because you are settled and have support, really consider whether a move/commute would be right from you, and hopefully my experience can shine some light on the reality of moving for career vs. putting your personal life first!
sarahxgthr
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Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2021 4:42 pm

Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by sarahxgthr »

Coxysmelons93 wrote: Sun May 22, 2022 1:23 pm I'm (sort of) in the same boat. Got a very low 2.1 in undergrad (rounded up from 59.4 to 60 due to a mitigating circumstances appeal, after I'd emailed 3 times and gone in person to put a claim in when the incident first happened in my second year but was not replied to and then told it was too late when I went in third year despite the effect of what happened being ongoing). Worth noting that the transcript is Identical they only changed the front page. At the time I was happy to have passed my degree at all to be honest let alone scrape a low 2.1 but I didn't realise the implications of it until applying this year.

I went on to get a distinction in my Master's and gain varied experience in support work, as an HCA and on my 2nd AP role with 1 publication and 1 submission for publication now but as I had to take a few years to heal from what happened in my 2nd year of undergrad, I am nearly 29 myself (got all my full time paid experience in the last 3.5 years).

I moved in with my partner in North Wales in October and love it here, I feel settled, I have friends here now and I love the outdoors. I also don't want to live apart from my partner again and whether he could move with me is uncertain, depends on whether he can get a job where I get on. My only options to stay living where I am are Liverpool, Bangor and at a big push Manchester or Staffordshire. Bangor is where I really want to go but one of my colleagues found out from one of the course directors that, although they advertise as accepting a 2.1 (regardless of low or high), they look at your transcript and if you got less than 60 in your third year (I got 59.8) they don't read your form, including the box 'any other factors relevant in your application' where I have explained the circumstances during my undergrad. I also struggle with short listing tests as I have Dyspraxia and my processing speed is only in the 9th percentile, I did ask Lancaster when I applied in 2019 for adjustments and was told I could have up to 10% extra time (always had 25-30% in exams), with 10% I was still only able to answer just over half the questions before the time ran out.

I had an interview for Leeds this year but part of me is relieved I didn't get on, as I would have had to move. It feels like you have to decide between the career you've been working towards or your personal life (on reflection the latter actually matters more to me). I will still apply next year but talk to all course centres first and also only apply to ones where placements would be commutable (wiling to travel 1 hour or slightly over) and if this means it takes me longer or I apply to less than 4, I'm OK with that. I have other goals I want to achieve in life, having a family, buying a house etc. the DClin is not the be all and end all. It took me a long time to rebuild my life and I'm not prepared to sacrifice my wellbeing or put my life on hold just to get on the DClin, plus I'm really enjoying my journey and current job.

I'd definitely recommend asking the courses before applying. I know, for example, Liverpool accepts 2.2s if you have a Master's at Merit or Distinction and a good academic reference, Lancaster aren't bothered about grade or experience, you just do the test. I'm pretty sure Newcastle and Teeside accept 2.2s if you have a postgrad too, I don't know if the placements there would be commutable to you as some course centres have placements in several counties- e.g. Manchester covers Merseyside and Cheshire, not just Greater Manchester- (I'm not sure where in Scotland you live so I could be way off, apologies if I am)?

And work as a research assistant or publications help to add academic points, some course centres also look at your A-levels (which I was really glad about). There's also the option of living where you get on during the week and then going home at weekends and of course the CAAP role, I'm considering that myself :)

Another option is doing a PHD as some course centres will only accept 2.2s if you've completed a PHD, my colleague is also doing a conversion course so it's that transcript that they will look at instead and Bangor said they will accept that but I wouldn't be sure about other course centres and of course it's a bit of an extreme way around this issue.

Wishing you all the best in your applications and buying a house :)

TLDR- Some course centres accept 2.2s provided you have a (good) Masters, doing a PHD is an option, living away during the week and going home at weekends is an option, always a good idea to ask the course centres directly and never put your personal life on hold or sacrifice your happiness to get on the DClin.

Ahhh I am pleased to hear you got your mitigating circumstances after such a difficult pursuit! I also got mitigating circumstances in my third year which looking back should have probably been considered in my final grade but weren't - it's so unfair that mitigating circumstances are so difficult to get, and then even despite them we are still locked out of the DClin! So sorry to hear you are also not being considered, my grades were very similar to yours, I think I missed a 2.1 by 2%

Also we sound at really similar points which is reassuring to hear - also amazing you got your MSc distinction! Isn't it mad that we have proved we can perform well academically at masters level but again are still not considered to most unis despite mitigating circumstances, its so frustrating :( I can't believe universities are not giving you more support also with your dyspraxia, that seems unbelievably unfair!! Really glad to hear you are taking your time and healing, I had to do similar myself which definitely slows things down

I think you are absolutely right that wellbeing has to come first, and there is definitely more to life like yourself that now I want to achieve, home ownership and having a family etc. It sounds like you are lovely and settled now too - I may again do similar to yourself and just apply for nearby or potentially commutable courses (not sure if Glasgow would accept me so next option would be Newcastle), would love to do a PHD too if it was affordable! Would have to look into options for that.

Thanks so much for your reply I feel much less alone now - and good luck with all of your applications! We will get there and find a right fit!!
sarahxgthr
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Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2021 4:42 pm

Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by sarahxgthr »

rachiepsy96 wrote: Mon May 23, 2022 9:20 am This time last year I moved 150 miles away from my friends and family for an AP post. I told myself that this was what I had to do for my psychology career as AP posts were so hard to come by and the posts where I lived (central Scotland) were so competitive and went to people with more experience than me. The post was fantastic and I was so supported within work. I loved the work as well so I do not regret the move in that respect. However, because of the move my 5 year relationship came to an end, my support network of friends and family were removed, and the location was rural so it was difficult to make friends. Despite the wonderful work, upon reflection it was not worth moving away for the job. I've recently applied at got on the DClin, and don't have to move for it, and feel so sure in my decision not to move again.

So, from personal experience, I would say because you are settled and have support, really consider whether a move/commute would be right from you, and hopefully my experience can shine some light on the reality of moving for career vs. putting your personal life first!
Thank you this has been really enlightening, I think you are definitely right that a support network is so important. It's so sad we feel we have to move so far away in order to get our dream career - but I am definitely in a similar boat at present (I am also central Scotland - the rural areas have SO much better psychology prospects)! I think I will consider very carefully any big moves and it may not be worthwhile, even if it takes longer perhaps I will eventually break here somewhere!

Well done for getting onto the DClin that's absolutely amazing!!! All the best with it!
Coxysmelons93
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Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by Coxysmelons93 »

sarahxgthr wrote: Mon May 23, 2022 7:12 pm Ahhh I am pleased to hear you got your mitigating circumstances after such a difficult pursuit! I also got mitigating circumstances in my third year which looking back should have probably been considered in my final grade but weren't - it's so unfair that mitigating circumstances are so difficult to get, and then even despite them we are still locked out of the DClin! So sorry to hear you are also not being considered, my grades were very similar to yours, I think I missed a 2.1 by 2%

Also we sound at really similar points which is reassuring to hear - also amazing you got your MSc distinction! Isn't it mad that we have proved we can perform well academically at masters level but again are still not considered to most unis despite mitigating circumstances, its so frustrating :( I can't believe universities are not giving you more support also with your dyspraxia, that seems unbelievably unfair!! Really glad to hear you are taking your time and healing, I had to do similar myself which definitely slows things down

I think you are absolutely right that wellbeing has to come first, and there is definitely more to life like yourself that now I want to achieve, home ownership and having a family etc. It sounds like you are lovely and settled now too - I may again do similar to yourself and just apply for nearby or potentially commutable courses (not sure if Glasgow would accept me so next option would be Newcastle), would love to do a PHD too if it was affordable! Would have to look into options for that.

Thanks so much for your reply I feel much less alone now - and good luck with all of your applications! We will get there and find a right fit!!
Thanks, I'm glad you feel less alone, there will be many others in a similar situation to us. I really hope you can get on at Newcastle or maybe even Glasgow, it really does feel unfair that the focus is so narrowly on undergrad, when a consistent pattern of good academic achievement over time from A-levels through to Master's (with a strong research component- my research project accounted for 1/3 of my MSc grade) or PHD level is a much better indicator of ability. Obviously it is completely fair that we would get less academic points than someone with a 1st, I would never argue with that, just with the focus being entirely on one point, rather than the whole picture. Sometimes things happen and get in the way, I really wish I'd had the experience I had during undergrad during my A-levels or Master's instead but that's not how it happened for me unfortunately.

All isn't lost for us, there are options, it's just harder, but the way I try and look at it is the experiences I had during my undergrad which led to the need for the consideration of mitigating circumstances have given me a level of empathy for clients that I otherwise wouldn't have, I truly know how trauma feels and that's what drives me to continue down this career path despite the barriers.

I'd also do a PHD if I could afford the paycut it would incur for 3 years but I can't unfortunately, especially with the cost of living right now. I'm not sure if there are any loans which can be applied for though, maybe there are, it is worth looking into in more depth as an option.

Reminding ourselves of other goals or important things in our life is so important, I've seen too many people getting so caught up in the process of getting on the DClin or getting their first AP role that they forget how to live in the present or look after themselves.

Hang in there and best of luck with your applications next year :)
alexh
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Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by alexh »

I had about a two hour commute to my course. For one placement I stayed in the placement area a few nights a week. For another I was able to stay with kind course mates who had a spare room in their shared house. For a couple I commuted daily. The course helped a little with placements a bit closer to my home but still within their patch, 90 minute drives. It was arduous, exhausting and there's no help with fuel costs which would be even worse now. I had one small child when I started and a second during. It placed an even greater demand on my wife, who also worked full time apart from her maternity leave, in terms of childcare commitment. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone but we'd already bought a house, my wife had a good job locally and my older child had already started school so moving wasn't an option for us.
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sarahxgthr
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Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2021 4:42 pm

Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by sarahxgthr »

Coxysmelons93 wrote: Tue May 24, 2022 2:59 pm
sarahxgthr wrote: Mon May 23, 2022 7:12 pm Ahhh I am pleased to hear you got your mitigating circumstances after such a difficult pursuit! I also got mitigating circumstances in my third year which looking back should have probably been considered in my final grade but weren't - it's so unfair that mitigating circumstances are so difficult to get, and then even despite them we are still locked out of the DClin! So sorry to hear you are also not being considered, my grades were very similar to yours, I think I missed a 2.1 by 2%

Also we sound at really similar points which is reassuring to hear - also amazing you got your MSc distinction! Isn't it mad that we have proved we can perform well academically at masters level but again are still not considered to most unis despite mitigating circumstances, its so frustrating :( I can't believe universities are not giving you more support also with your dyspraxia, that seems unbelievably unfair!! Really glad to hear you are taking your time and healing, I had to do similar myself which definitely slows things down

I think you are absolutely right that wellbeing has to come first, and there is definitely more to life like yourself that now I want to achieve, home ownership and having a family etc. It sounds like you are lovely and settled now too - I may again do similar to yourself and just apply for nearby or potentially commutable courses (not sure if Glasgow would accept me so next option would be Newcastle), would love to do a PHD too if it was affordable! Would have to look into options for that.

Thanks so much for your reply I feel much less alone now - and good luck with all of your applications! We will get there and find a right fit!!
Thanks, I'm glad you feel less alone, there will be many others in a similar situation to us. I really hope you can get on at Newcastle or maybe even Glasgow, it really does feel unfair that the focus is so narrowly on undergrad, when a consistent pattern of good academic achievement over time from A-levels through to Master's (with a strong research component- my research project accounted for 1/3 of my MSc grade) or PHD level is a much better indicator of ability. Obviously it is completely fair that we would get less academic points than someone with a 1st, I would never argue with that, just with the focus being entirely on one point, rather than the whole picture. Sometimes things happen and get in the way, I really wish I'd had the experience I had during undergrad during my A-levels or Master's instead but that's not how it happened for me unfortunately.

All isn't lost for us, there are options, it's just harder, but the way I try and look at it is the experiences I had during my undergrad which led to the need for the consideration of mitigating circumstances have given me a level of empathy for clients that I otherwise wouldn't have, I truly know how trauma feels and that's what drives me to continue down this career path despite the barriers.

I'd also do a PHD if I could afford the paycut it would incur for 3 years but I can't unfortunately, especially with the cost of living right now. I'm not sure if there are any loans which can be applied for though, maybe there are, it is worth looking into in more depth as an option.

Reminding ourselves of other goals or important things in our life is so important, I've seen too many people getting so caught up in the process of getting on the DClin or getting their first AP role that they forget how to live in the present or look after themselves.

Hang in there and best of luck with your applications next year :)
Yeah you are absolutely right, thank you so much! And absolutely, my masters was heavily research based also - you would have thought the emphasis would have been more on that qualification as clearly we can perform at a high level. And you are so right, I imagine loads of people are in the same boat and potentially suffered poorer grades and weren't able to reach their full potential due to various life circumstances, this is something that surely must be considered as valid especially in this profession :(

And that's a really good point, I totally agree that having our own difficulties and trauma in life means we can relate and understand that much more which would benefit those we are working with, I definitely am glad I went through it all and came out the other side now as I learned so much! Yeah it's such a shame PHD's and even some other psych disciplines (such as health) are inaccessible to most as they are so expensive!

And that's so true - its so easy to get caught up in where we wish we were and comparing ourselves to others but we absolutely need to remember how far we have came and appreciate the present, hard to do sometimes but worthwhile remembering that things aren't so bad!

And you too - would love to hear about how you get on in the future! :D
sarahxgthr
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Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by sarahxgthr »

alexh wrote: Tue May 24, 2022 4:26 pm I had about a two hour commute to my course. For one placement I stayed in the placement area a few nights a week. For another I was able to stay with kind course mates who had a spare room in their shared house. For a couple I commuted daily. The course helped a little with placements a bit closer to my home but still within their patch, 90 minute drives. It was arduous, exhausting and there's no help with fuel costs which would be even worse now. I had one small child when I started and a second during. It placed an even greater demand on my wife, who also worked full time apart from her maternity leave, in terms of childcare commitment. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone but we'd already bought a house, my wife had a good job locally and my older child had already started school so moving wasn't an option for us.
Thank you so much for your reply and really well done for managing to balance so much, what a hard 3 years that must have been! I think you are right to not recommend, sometimes I feel there is such pressure to accept anywhere that will give us a chance in this field even if it sacrifices everything, and I potentially would be looking at a similar situation if I accepted my nearest uni who would potentially consider me (2 and a half hours away) while also trying to settle down with my partner, buy a home and start a family. And very good point about the money too, it would probably bankrupt me!

Hope you are nice and settled now and have finished the hard part!
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miriam
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Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by miriam »

Coxysmelons93 wrote: Sun May 22, 2022 1:23 pm Bangor is where I really want to go but one of my colleagues found out from one of the course directors that, although they advertise as accepting a 2.1 (regardless of low or high), they look at your transcript and if you got less than 60 in your third year (I got 59.8) they don't read your form, including the box 'any other factors relevant in your application' where I have explained the circumstances during my undergrad.
I'm always cautious about this kind of black-and-white statement, particularly when it is based on second hand information from one individual. It creates the kind of beliefs that may not have any basis in fact, but become part of the "rumour mill". Why not just ask that course directly whether they consider mitigating circumstances when someone has a 2:1 with a low third year score or whether it is an instant no?
Miriam

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Coxysmelons93
Posts: 19
Joined: Sun Feb 13, 2022 6:01 pm

Re: Move/commute for DClinPsy advice?

Post by Coxysmelons93 »

miriam wrote: Thu May 26, 2022 12:42 am
Coxysmelons93 wrote: Sun May 22, 2022 1:23 pm Bangor is where I really want to go but one of my colleagues found out from one of the course directors that, although they advertise as accepting a 2.1 (regardless of low or high), they look at your transcript and if you got less than 60 in your third year (I got 59.8) they don't read your form, including the box 'any other factors relevant in your application' where I have explained the circumstances during my undergrad.
I'm always cautious about this kind of black-and-white statement, particularly when it is based on second hand information from one individual. It creates the kind of beliefs that may not have any basis in fact, but become part of the "rumour mill". Why not just ask that course directly whether they consider mitigating circumstances when someone has a 2:1 with a low third year score or whether it is an instant no?
I wouldn't take it as fact but my colleague spoke to directly to one of the course directors on a teams call arranged by my her manager as she's applied a few times and wanted to know what she could do better. I was sat in the room in the background while she was on this call as we have a lack of private rooms to do trams calls so she was on it in our office. She did ask about mitigating circumstances and was told you can see them from the transcript (which you can't). Obviously I only have her half of the conversation I could hear and what she said immediately after to go on and there is some potential for misunderstanding and bias there but it was more than something I heard in passing. I do intend on asking them anyway but don't have high hopes. You never know, next year they might change their process, so it's always worth asking.
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